Posts by Escapegoat

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news…children-home/ar-BB17ELoN



    Within 11 days of schools opening, dozens of students and teachers have gotten COVID-19: 'I truly wish we'd kept our children home'

    [email protected] (Susie Neilson) 12 hrs ago







    Business Insider logoWithin 11 days of schools opening, dozens of students and teachers have gotten COVID-19: 'I truly wish we'd kept our children home'




    a little girl that is standing in the snow: A kid attends school in the Netherlands while wearing a face mask on May 14, 2020. Robin Utrecht/Echoes Wire/Barcroft Media/Getty Images© Robin Utrecht/Echoes Wire/Barcroft Media/Getty Images A kid attends school in the Netherlands while wearing a face mask on May 14, 2020. Robin Utrecht/Echoes Wire/Barcroft Media/Getty Images

    • As US schools begin reopening, dozens of students and school employees are testing positive for COVID-19.
    • Hundreds of students and some teachers have been ordered to quarantine.
    • Recent research suggests that children may spread the coronavirus as efficiently as adults.
    • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

    Joel Barnes wanted schools to reopen in his Mississippi city.

    A retired teacher, Barnes knew that his own kids missed seeing their friends and learning in person. Their district in Corinth was taking precautions: 7th and 8th graders were to stay in a special wing of the high school, and there were virtual learning options, too.

    So Barnes and his wife Lindsay decided to send their four children back.

    "It's just one of those hard decisions," Barnes told Business Insider. "You're danged if you do, danged if you don't."

    The kids — his youngest is in 2nd grade while his oldest is a high-school freshman — started school on July 27. By the end of the first week, the district announced that a high-school student had tested positive. Two more were diagnosed the following week. Then two more. Then a student at the middle school. And then an elementary school employee.

    "I did not expect it to go up so quickly — within a week and a half of school starting," Barnes said.

    At least 115 students who had close contact with the sick people in the Corinth school district have been sent home to quarantine for 14 days, according to CNN. Barnes' 14-year-old son is one of them.

    "I'm so angry," Lindsay Barnes said on Thursday. "We tried to pull him yesterday and the school wouldn't let us."

    a person standing in front of a school bus: Corinth Elementary School students exit their bus wearing masks to protect against coronavirus, as they arrive for their first day back to school, July 27, 2020 in Corinth, Mississippi. Adam Robison/Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal/AP© Adam Robison/Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal/AP Corinth Elementary School students exit their bus wearing masks to protect against coronavirus, as they arrive for their first day back to school, July 27, 2020 in Corinth, Mississippi. Adam Robison/Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal/AP

    Corinth's experience does not stand alone. As schools across the US begin to reopen, several districts have already seen outbreaks of COVID-19.

    In Georgia's Cherokee school district, three students have tested positive and a kindergarten class was sent home after a teacher displayed symptoms. A handful of employees at Louisiana's Jefferson Parish school district tested positive two days into their school year, and at least six students in Kentucky tested positive after their first weeks back, too. Four school districts in Central Indiana, meanwhile, have identified at least seven cases since schools began reopening last week.

    Together, these small outbreaks highlight the risks of reopening schools while the US continues to report high daily case numbers. (The country's seven-day average still exceeds 50,000 new cases per day.) More than 80% of Americans live in a county where a school of 500 students or more would see at least one infection of COVID-19 within the first week of reopening, according to a recent New York Times analysis.

    Evidence suggests children can spread coronavirus like adults

    Although kids are less likely to get severe coronavirus cases, mounting evidence suggests they can spread the virus. Most children have the same amount of virus in their upper respiratory tracts as adults do, according to a research letter published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics, and children under 5 may have between 10 and 100 times more virus than adults (though this doesn't necessarily mean they spread the virus more efficiently).

    A study published last week found that US school closures from March to May reduced the weekly rate of new cases in the US by 62%.

    According to a July survey, 60% of US parents — and 76% of parents of color — support schools' plans to delay reopening.

    Although Barnes was initially part of the other 40%, the recent spike in cases has rattled his family.

    His son reported that some of his high-school peers — and even his teachers — were wearing masks either improperly or not at all. Barnes said that lax approach to mask-wearing is reflected across Corinth.

    As of Thursday, his three younger children — all elementary-school-aged girls — were still going in. He doesn't blame the school district for the outbreak; he blames a lack of political leadership from officials in his state and the federal government.

    "With the way these cases have been handled at this point, I truly wish we'd kept our children home," Barnes said.

    Read the original article on Business Insider



    https://sports.yahoo.com/trump…of-success-095439985.html



    Trump says behind closed doors snooker hamper his chances of success

    a21b7d80-de3e-11e9-9df7-da10fe5d7587

    Sportsbeat
    Yahoo Sport UKAug 6, 2020, 2:54 AM

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    By subscribing, you are agreeing to Yahoo's Terms and Privacy Policy Defending world champion Trump reckons the absence of fans will play into lower-ranked players' handsDefending world champion Trump reckons the absence of fans will play into lower-ranked players' hands More

    Judd Trump reckons behind closed doors snooker gives the lower-ranked players a better chance of seizing his Crucible crown, writes Will Jennings." data-reactid="23">Judd Trump reckons behind closed doors snooker gives the lower-ranked players a better chance of seizing his Crucible crown, writes Will Jennings.

    Bristol’s world No.1 takes on Yan Bingtao in the second round of the World Championship on Thursday, having beaten Tom Ford in the tournament’s opening match to keep his hopes of defending his title alive.

    Ranking event winner Bingtao is the current world No.16 and Trump believes the sound of Sheffield silence will only play into the underdog's hands.

    “It was always going to be tough, especially with no crowds in and for the lower ranked players, they may have a better shot at it with less pressure out there,” the 30-year-old said.

    “It’s going to be tough - everyone’s learning on the job out there and hopefully we can still produce a good standard.

    “It’s so different for everyone - there’s still gong to be pressure out there, it’s still such a special arena and special atmosphere.

    “The Crucible is so different to every other event for me and I’m sure everybody else feels the same - it’s exciting to be here.

    “It will still be difficult but it perhaps gives the lower-ranked players and the inexperienced players a little bit of a better chance.”

    Trump toppled Ford 10-8 and it was far from straightforward for the 17-time ranking event winner, as he was made to battle against an opponent who at one stage looked well-placed to achieve a maximum 147 break.

    And that was a contest played in front of a limited number of fans, with the World Championship one of three sports events being used as part of a Government pilot scheme trialling the safe return of spectators.

    That scheme - which also included Glorious Goodwood racing festival and domestic county cricket - was scrapped on Friday to dash Trump’s hopes of defending his title in front of supporters.

    Trump knows he’ll face a sterner test than Ford against precocious 20-year-old Bingtao in round two, who won the Riga Masters earlier in the season after sparkling under the Latvian arena lights.

    Trump, winner of six ranking events this season himself, has nothing but respect for the Chinese prodigy and knows he’ll have to be at his best to come out on top.

    “He’s done amazing - I think he’s been in a lot of big tournaments and big finals, he’s won an event, which is amazing for his age,” he added.

    “It normally takes players a lot longer to get through in this sort of era as there are a lot of 40-something year-olds.

    “He’s very consistent and very mature beyond his years.”

    https://www.huffpost.com/entry…m3Wn6Fei3M6vJMgCzbk67EN_8


    Oregon Could Become The First State To Decriminalize Drugs

    A November ballot initiative would decriminalize drug possession and build a treatment program outside of the criminal justice system.

    headshot
    By Paul Blumenthal
    5f2aeaac1f00004e28339324.jpeg?cache=yd4fsthlgh&ops=scalefit_720_noupscaleILLUSTRATION: REBECCA ZISSER/HUFFPOST; PHOTOS: GETTY

    Nearly two people die every day from drug overdoses in Oregon. One out of 11 Oregonians suffer from addiction. The state also ranks last in the nation among states in access to drug treatment and recovery services for adults, according to a federal government survey on national drug use.

    This fall, it might become the first state in the nation to decriminalize drug possession. Initiative 44, which will be on the ballot in November, would end the criminalization of simple drug possession of small amounts of all drugs by changing the penalties from felonies and misdemeanors to a $100 administrative fine. The initiative would also use excess tax money from the sale of legal marijuana to fund a new drug treatment, recovery and harm reduction program outside of the criminal justice system. The fine could be waived if the recipient chooses to undergo a voluntary treatment assessment under the new system.

    “What we’re trying to do is put drug use back where it belongs, which is under that public health scope and completely remove it from the criminal justice system,” said Matt Sutton, a spokesman for Drug Policy Action, a national harm reduction nonprofit backing Initiative 44.

    The decriminalization of drugs in Oregon would mark a significant shift toward ending the nation’s half-century war on drugs, which is largely waged to the detriment of Black, Latino and other minority communities. One of the demands of the Black Lives Matter protests following the killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police has been the restructuring of the relationship between the police and communities of color. The decriminalization of drugs and creation of a treatment system separate from the criminal justice system would be one step in that direction.

    The initiative’s success could lead other states to follow suit, as previous drug liberalization initiatives have done.

    “Like we’ve seen with medical cannabis and cannabis legalization, the success in one state will attract policymakers in other states to follow suit,” said Anthony Johnson, the chief petitioner for Initiative 44.

    The initiative was initially conceived under the shadow of a dramatic rise in drug overdose deaths related to the opioid and methamphetamine crises in the past 20 years. The national drug overdose death rate more than tripled from 1999 to 2018, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — yet another example of the country’s failed policy of criminalizing drugs.

    Initiative 44 is facing no substantive opposition and has been endorsed by groups ranging from NAACP Portland, local Black Lives Matter chapters, physicians groups and AFSCME, the government workers union whose membership includes corrections officers.

    The proposal is based on the decriminalization and treatment policies adopted by Portugal in 2001. Portugal had seen a rapid increase in HIV infections due to intravenous drug use in the late 1990s. In response, it decided to decriminalize drug possession and set up a treatment and recovery system so that its citizens suffering from drug addiction could get the help they needed. The country has since seen a large reduction in HIV infections, particularly those related to intravenous drug use.


    But in the United States, the problems of drug criminalization and enforcement do not just have negative consequences for public health by failing to adequately provide treatment to addicts.

    The war on drugs has for 50 years been one of the major drivers of racial disparities in police stops, searches, arrests, convictions and imprisonment in the nation’s criminal justice system. The criminalization of large swathes of minority communities, particularly Black men, through the racially discriminatory application of war on drugs enforcement has, in turn, created collateral consequences in access to housing, employment and family formation. This is despite the fact that drug use rates are similar across all races.

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    And these trends are just as true in Oregon, with its low Black population, as they are in the rest of the United States.

    Bobby Byrd, a Black resident of Portland, Oregon, was arrested 26 years ago for possession of cocaine. He had suffered problems with cocaine addiction since he was a teenager. He was in the middle of a relapse when he went to a strip club in Northeast Portland known for drug sales after work one day and police arrested him.

    For nearly 30 years, Byrd says he has been denied promotions and fired from jobs when he reported his felony conviction. When he sought training at a community college to become a drug and alcohol counselor or a phlebotomist, he was discouraged from pursuing those careers, and when he and his wife divorced he said he couldn’t find anyone who would rent to him — all because of his felony conviction.

    “It really feels like ... my sentence started after I [served it],” Byrd said.

    Byrd, who now works as an organizer in support of Initiative 44, is just one of the thousands of Black men and women who have been disproportionately affected by Oregon’s criminalization of drug possession. A 2018 study conducted by the Oregon Criminal Justice Commission found that from 2012 to 2016, Black Oregonians were 2.5 times more likely to be convicted for drug possession as white Oregonians, despite both groups reporting similar rates of drug use.

    Oregon has already taken steps to tackle these disparities by reducing criminal penalties for drug possession. The state legalized marijuana in 2014 and the legislature passed a bill in 2017 that was backed by law enforcement to reduce a number of drug possession crimes from felonies to misdemeanors. Initiative 44 builds on this history by fully decriminalizing small drug possession crimes.

    The initiative would nearly eliminate the racial disparities in drug possession arrests and convictions, according to a draft report released by the Oregon Criminal Justice Commission in July. If the initiative were enacted, it would reduce drug possession convictions by over 90% for Black and Indigenous Oregonians.

    For Byrd, passing the initiative is about making sure that no one in Oregon suffers as he did simply because of an arrest that stemmed from his inability to get treatment for his drug problem.

    “It won’t change my past,” Byrd said. “I understand that and I’m OK with that. I don’t want this to happen to anyone in the future. I don’t want anyone to go through what I went through.”

    Then this:


    https://www.nbcnews.com/politi…unning-mate-pick-n1236049




    Gov. Gretchen Whitmer remains on Biden's list as running mate pick nears

    The Michigan governor has been on Biden's list of potential running mates all along, Democrats close to the process say.

    Image:In a photo provided by the Michigan Office of the Governor, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer addresses the state during a speech in Lansing, Mich., on Aug. 5, 2020.Michigan Office of the Governor via AP

    Aug. 6, 2020, 9:52 AM PDT
    By Kristen Welker, Mike Memoli, Julia Jester and Andrea Mitchell

    As Joe Biden appears set to begin holding final one-on-one conversations with potential running mates, sources close to the process tell NBC News that Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer is among those still under serious consideration.

    In recent weeks, public speculation about Biden’s narrowing short list had centered largely on a quartet of African American women — Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., Rep. Karen Bass, D-Calif., former national security adviser Susan Rice and Rep. Val Demings, D-Fla. — with Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., also still in the running.

    Democrats with knowledge of the process tell NBC News Whitmer did not just re-emerge as a potential vice presidential pick, but had long remained in the top tier for the only person with a vote in the process: Biden himself.

    n_mtpd_clip_bidenlist_200805_1920x1080.focal-860x484.jpg

    n_mtpd_clip_bidenlist_200805_1920x1080.focal-760x428.jpg

    Biden set to interview VP candidates this week

    AUG. 5, 202002:09

    Top labor leaders in Whitmer’s battleground state tell NBC News that the Biden campaign has reached out to the state chapters of the UAW, AFL-CIO and Teamsters to sound them out about Whitmer. That outreach began as early as January ahead of the Iowa caucuses, but intensified lately as the vetting process advanced.

    “I think what the national team recognizes is that it’s awfully hard for a Democrat to become president if they can’t carry Michigan,” said state Rep. Brian Elder, chair of the Michigan Legislative Labor Caucus.

    Whitmer brings obvious strengths to the table beyond her popularity in a key battleground state. Senior Biden campaign officials have made clear again in recent days that they believe the COVID-19 pandemic combined with President Donald Trump’s management of the crisis and the resulting economic fallout is the central issue of the fall campaign. Whitmer has earned the respect of Biden officials for her steady hand during the crisis, at times in the face of strong opposition.

    "Governor, I've paid close attention to your leadership in Michigan from the time you got elected, while you were campaigning, and particularly this past week,” Biden told Whitmer when he interviewed her in April — publicly, on his “Here’s The Deal” podcast.

    Recommended

    200728-joe-biden-se-530p_cb7442c6edc2c4667aff285daf1199f7.focal-60x60.jpg

    2020 ELECTIONWhat will guide Joe Biden's vice presidential decision

    200803-joe-biden-jm-1059_deb31ef4688d533bf2efb1a55fe754eb.focal-60x60.jpg

    2020 ELECTIONBiden focuses on narrowing VP list, plans to interview finalists this week

    “What's impressed me is both that how impressive and important your leadership has been," he said. "You're just doing an incredible job. The people in Michigan should be so proud of having you. And, you know, and you're respected by all the other governors — I talked to governors from the East Coast to the West Coast. I'm on the phone with them all the time.”

    The Biden campaign continues to navigate intense lobbying efforts about the choice, including the view of many that he should choose a woman of color.

    Whitmer, notably, held a press conference Wednesday to announce a pair of executive orders focused on racial justice, including a “first of its kind” advisory council to address racism within state government, and one recognizing racism as a public health crisis. She was joined in the announcement by Lt. Gov. Garlin Gilchrist, who, if Whitmer were to become vice president, would become Michigan’s first, and the nation’s only Black governor.

    The Biden campaign has also long viewed the recipe for success for the party in the 2018 midterms as their blueprint in 2020 — particularly significant turnout for Democratic candidates among women voters in suburban, swing districts. Whitmer was one of those successful candidates as she won her seat by nearly 10 points. Biden campaigned with her that September. She returned the favor in the presidential race, endorsing him in March ahead of her state’s key primary and becoming a national campaign co-chair.

    Ford really fucked up putting IFS on it. Yeah Jeeps don't handle great on the road, but nobody decides not to buy one because it doesn't have IFS. Lots of people will stick with Jeep because of it.

    My son actually studied that claim when he was in college. It turns out the average lifespan was heavily influenced not by old age but by the high child mortality rate which was common at the time. The odds of you living longer increased the older you got. And by the 1500's if you lived to be 21 your life expectancy rose to about 72 years old. Not terribly different then now.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-53684033

    New York attorney general sues to dissolve NRA

    • 5 hours ago

    p08myq18.jpgMedia captionWATCH: 'Nobody is above the law, not even the NRA'


    New York's attorney general has announced a lawsuit aimed at dissolving the powerful National Rifle Association over alleged financial mismanagement.

    Letitia James said the NRA had diverted millions of dollars to leaders including its chief executive, Wayne LaPierre, for their personal use.

    "For these years of misconduct we are seeking an order to dissolve the NRA in its entirety," she said.

    The NRA described the lawsuit as a "baseless, premeditated attack".

    What did the attorney general say?

    Ms James said that the four named defendants - Mr LaPierre, Wilson Phillips, Joshua Powell and John Frazer - "instituted a culture of self-dealing, mismanagement and negligent oversight at the NRA that was illegal, oppressive and fraudulent".

    The attorney general outlined a litany of charges against the defendants, but accused Mr LaPierre, long the face of the powerful gun lobby group, of being the "central figure" behind the organisation's wrongdoings.

    One example of misconduct alleged in the lawsuit states that Mr LaPierre visited the Bahamas more than eight times by private plane using funds intended for the NRA, for a total cost of $500,000 (£380,000).

    The corruption "is so broad", Ms James said, that total dissolution of the organisation is necessary. Wayne LaPierre of the NRAImage copyrightEPAImage captionWayne LaPierre nearly three decades as executive vice-president of the NRA

    Responding to questions, Ms James, a Democrat, rejected the notion that the charges against the NRA - closely tied to the Republican party - were at all influenced by her own politics.

    "We followed the facts and the law," she said. "We've come to the conclusion that the NRA unfortunately was serving as a personal piggy bank to four individual defendants."

    The case filed by Ms James' office alleges more than $64m (£48.7m) was lost in just three years as a result of the defendants' abuse.

    Also on Thursday, the District Attorney for Washington, DC filed a separate lawsuit against the organisation "for misusing charitable funds to support wasteful spending by the NRA and its executives".

    The New York lawsuit will almost certainly be contested in court by the NRA. The suit will add another strain to an already beleaguered organisation, facing congressional inquiries, investigations in multiple states and internal complaints.

    What is the NRA?

    Founded in 1871 as a recreational group designed to "promote and encourage rifle shooting", the National Rifle Association has grown into one of the most powerful political organisations in the US.

    The NRA now lobbies heavily against all forms of gun control and argues aggressively that more guns make the country safer. It relies on, and staunchly defends, a disputed interpretation of the Second Amendment to the US Constitution, which it argues gives US citizens the rights to bear arms.

    The NRA spends about $250m per year, far more than all the country's gun control advocacy groups put together. A woman sits by a sign that saysImage copyrightGETTY IMAGESImage captionThe NRA is at the centre of the country's deep political divide on gun control

    The organisation has boasted some high-profile members over the years, including former President George HW Bush. Mr Bush resigned from the group in 1995 after Mr La Pierre referred to federal agents in the wake of the Oklahoma City bombing as "jack-booted thugs".

    Members have included former vice-presidential candidate Sarah Palin, and actors Tom Selleck and Whoopi Goldberg. The organisation strongly backed Donald Trump in the 2016 election, but has faced scrutiny over its accounting practices in recent years and backlash from gun control advocates following high profile school shootings.

    What's the reaction?

    In a statement, NRA President Carolyn Meadows decried the lawsuit as "a transparent attempt to score political points".

    "As evidenced by the lawsuit filed by the NRA today against the [New York Attorney General] we not only will not shrink from this fight - we will confront it and prevail," she said

    Speaking to reporters outside the White House, President Donald Trump called the suit a "very terrible thing".

    The Republican president - a vocal defender of the Second Amendment - has been allied with the NRA since he launched his campaign for president.

    "I think the NRA should move to Texas and lead a very good and beautiful life," Mr Trump said on Thursday. "Texas would be a great place, or to another state of their choosing."

    The move against the NRA was celebrated by several prominent Democrats.

    "The NRA bought the president and promotes members of Congress that turn a blind eye to the gun violence epidemic," wrote Senator Kamala Harris on Twitter.

    "It's time to end the violence and recklessness. End the NRA," wrote long-time Democratic congresswoman Barbara Lee. line

    Tinyhands and guns

    Analysis by Tara McKelvey, BBC White House reporter

    The attorney general of New York has had it with the NRA, but Tinyhands has not.

    Ms James alleges that the gun lobby is rife with corruption and no longer has the right to call itself a non-profit charity. In contrast the president sees a beleaguered organisation, one that is in search of a new home where it will be appreciated, and recommends Texas, a place famous for its gun lovers.

    The president's affection for the NRA goes back to his previous presidential campaign, a time when the NRA supported his efforts to get elected. The NRA reportedly donated $30m to his 2016 campaign, making them one of his biggest supporters - if not the biggest.

    Tinyhands has softened on some of his positions regarding the rights of gun owners while he has been in office. But now that his colleagues at the NRA are really in trouble, he has shown his support and said they should move their offices.

    In Texas, he told me and other reporters on the South Lawn today, the NRA can have a "beautiful" life. Spoken like a true friend.

    https://www.huffpost.com/entry…_5f2849e2c5b656e9b09edd7a


    Anthony Fauci Says He’s Hired Security To Protect Daughters From Death Threats

    The nation’s top infectious disease expert said he “wouldn’t have imagined in my wildest dreams” that people would threaten him over public health principles.

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    By Carla Herreria Russo


    Dr. Anthony Fauci said Wednesday that he’s had to hire security to protect himself and his family after receiving death threats from people who object to his work on the coronavirus pandemic and the science behind regulations.

    During a livestreamed talk with CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta hosted by Harvard’s School of Public Health, the infectious disease expert said he was taken aback by the harassment he and his family have received in the last few months.

    Noting that crisis “brings out the best of people and the worst of people,” Fauci said, “getting death threats for me and my family and harassing my daughters to the point where I have to get security, it’s amazing.”

    Fauci said his wife and daughters were “fine” but stressed by the threats.

    “I wouldn’t have imagined in my wildest dreams that people who object to things that are pure public health principles are so set against it and don’t like what you and I say, namely in the world of science, that they actually threaten you,” he said.

    Fauci previously revealed that he and his family were facing “serious threats” during an interview on “The Axe Files” podcast in July. At that time, he called the threats “a little bit disturbing.”

    Fauci had his own personal security detail as early as April, according to reports from CNN and The Hill.

    Fauci is one of the most prominent figures in the White House’s coronavirus task force but has also been at odds with members of the Trump administration, including President Donald Trump himself, as he offered bleak predictions as the pandemic worsened.

    Trump has undermined and contradicted some of Fauci’s recommendations and information during the pandemic. This past weekend, Trump directly challenged Fauci by retweeting a video of the doctor explaining why the U.S. has experienced another surge in coronavirus cases over the summer while cases in European countries have fallen.

    “Wrong!” the president tweeted.

    Peter Navarro, Trump’s top trade adviser, even published an op-ed against Fauci in USA Today in an attempt to discredit him, claiming the infectious disease expert “has been wrong about everything I have interacted with him on.”

    He's going to say that. I predicted that he's going to brag about how he can't wait to beat up on Trump at the debates, then he will have something come up that prevents him from attending. I'm saying it's going to be covid. He's going to get a fake bout of that and he will bravely fight it off, but the debates will unfortunately not go forward, for understandable reasons. That will be the line they take.


    I think you're right. I think Biden's caretakers are smart enough to know that the debates are a bad idea.


    But I sort of hope I'm wrong. The Doddering Demented Dotard Debate would be really funny. Tinyhands is only slightly less fucked up than Biden. They will both make fools of themselves. And in the end it won't really matter. Everybody knows that Biden is a dotard. People are so sick of Tinyhands' stupidity that they are willing to elect an empty suit just to get rid of him. They'll wheel Biden out for speeches and such. But they are nominating Susan Rice to signal that any actual work will be done by bureaucrats from the Obama Administration.

    Yeah it's gonna be Susan Rice. Way better pick than Harris. It signals that this will be a continuation of the Obama Regime. That will work nicely to motivate the Black vote. And we'll get to hear cuntservatives scream about Benghazi for the next 11 years.