Posts by grav


    Full moons happen all the time.

    The sun goes behind the globe, depriving the moon of light to reflect back to earth.

    But, there it is. A fully illuminated ball floating up there.

    Because . . . . . . refraction. yeah.


    And then we have selenelions, ☽,

    eclipses of the moon when the sun is above the horizon.

    Because . . . . . . refraction. uh huh.


    There is your globe model precsion.

    My bad.

    I posted the wrong video above.

    You globeheads might even be interested in how the FECore team mapped the sun's path over one year.

    19 minutes.


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    Science has brought us the modern world, including the devise from which you are posting.


    You really want to throw that away?

    Science?

    or technology?

    Not the same thing.

    Science gives us

    . the Germ theory

    . the Atom theory

    . Climate change theory............global warming and-or ice age

    . fossil fuels, derived from dead ancient plants and animals which "decomposed" oddly

    . vaccine efficacy and safety

    Speaking of, what really brought down numbers of dreaded diseases? ->-> sewage treatment and clean water


    disease-graph.jpg


    Sorry to say, but real science died before 1958.

    What we have now is NWO pseudoscience.

    But if I were at sea or in Kansas, even with binoculars, I can’t see further than a few miles. (To the horizon)


    So my weak human eyes aren’t really an issue

    Ah, but if your binoculars see further than where the alleged curve is supposed to be, then you must be in Kansas, Dorothy.


    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTMEk4IZwaKOH2d-690h91X69IHYOha91FN78Ye87ZYUSormJpRwPyaZV6HL7106EItgOM&usqp=CAU

    Exactly ^

    Einstein was no doubt a flerfer who went to the dark side.


    Back to basics. Real math for real science.


    How far can we see if we live on a ball 8000 miles wide?


    Quote

    So, for all practical purposes, we can estimate the distance to the horizon using 1.22459√h (or perhaps even more simply as just 1.2√h), which gives the distance in miles when h is in feet. The metric version is s ≈ 3.56972 √h ≈ 3.6 √h in kilometers, with h in meters.


    How far away is the horizon?

    https://sites.math.washington.edu › m120-general

    PDF


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    1:15


    DIY proof:

    Take a 6-ft. guy and square his height -- 2.44948974278

    Multiply by 1.22

    2.9883774862 (~3 miles)

    boom

    close enough for government work

    driving IN a car?

    You mean a vehicle with walls and a roof and specified volume?

    an enclosed habitat, so to speak.

    Yes


    The explanation rhat we are on a ball and ruled by consistent forces that rule everything else is much much more simple than crystalline spheres, and infinite planes.

    Are you drunk?

    I think so.


    Occam smiles at your spinning ball which hangs out in a vacuum with other spinning balls.

    And your consistent forces, lol.

    Like gravity, which lets butterflies and clouds roam wherever they wish.

    And e=mc^2, which has light speed disregarding the Inverse Square law.

    as in law, not theory.

    As a Occam, the barber once said, the simplest explanation is probably the truth.

    You mean that?

    That our senses and logic tell us

    . that we live on a motionless world with a sun, moon, and stars moving above us?

    . that water seeks its own level in oceans?

    . that the still air is indeed still, not spinning 1000 mph and vortexing 66,600 mph?

    moar wrong stuffs

    :/?


    moon-earth-transit-nasa.gif

    21st time maybe ^

    And, how come why

    clouds don't move during the 5 hour timeline?

    And, what the heck is that weird ◇◇ shape off the coast of Alaska?

    And why does the moon look like a flat gray circle?


    And how curious that the globe looks like an angry blue 🤡

    hmm, sorry to bother you again, but I saw no info in the archives.

    Once again you pick something out of the already explained archives.


    Are you now going to post a mirage pic of Chicago?

    Already explained archives?

    Is there a link to it -- like Nasa.shill.bs.gov ?? I would like to buy the Kindle format.


    What does the handbook say about the US looking so teeny tiny on the lunar transit gif?

    US 3000 miles wide vs Planet Earth 8000 miles

    123

    1 2 3 5 6 7 8

    ?

    why so small?

    Was the oddly dinky US a camera artifact ? made by an astro-not taking a picture through the porthole of a spaceship?

    atmospheric refraction/compression/mirage?

    moon as a sphere can never be illuminated fully with only one light source. One half of that sphere will always be illuminated fully unless the Earth is directly between it and the sun, an eclipse. Simple geometry grav.

    only one light source?

    half will always be illuminated unless blocked by earth? except when selenelions occur and light bends/reflects/refracts to the wrong side vis-a-vis the sun.


    ?

    Whose side are you on ???

    And what keeps that giant space rock from falling into earth's gravity?

    Holden will tell us it falls sideways, which we see all the time in real life.

    Pardon my sarc.


    The constellations have changed.

    Evidence?

    Actually, the star patterns are unchanged since Pisces and Sagittarius and all the other sparkly forms were copied down thousands of years ago,.

    So, Holden, you're saying sunlight hits earth's dense atmosphere, then bounces it up to light up the other side of the moon?

    Wouldn't the heavy density bend the light down?


    refraction-of-light-in-water20150805-30610-expmep-e1519813676926.jpg?w=1024


    Here is another demonstration of light reflecting, off the dome


    c459e18404d97745128f2b4bfff19712.jpg


    and how about those constellations?


    a6a5a9d38ed334ad5c80fe91e329256a.jpg