Tinyhands Finally Admits That His Re-Election’s Swirling Down the Golden Toilet

  • https://www.thedailybeast.com/…ng-down-the-golden-toilet

    Trump Finally Admits That His Re-Election’s Swirling Down the Golden Toilet

    SOS


    It’s no coincidence that Trump mused about delaying the election on the same morning that the U.S. economy reported by far the worst quarter in American history.

    matt-lewis-author-photo.jpg

    Matt Lewis


    Senior Columnist

    Updated Aug. 01, 2020 10:20AM ET / Published Jul. 30, 2020 12:39PM ET




    200730-lewis-tough-trump-hero_bdey1uOPINION

    Donald Trump’s Tweet Thursday morning “just asking” about delaying the presidential election might be a shark bump ahead of him devouring democracy, but it seems much more likely it is the pathetic last gasp of a desperate, losing politician: The moment where Trump publicly came to grips with the fact that his reelection campaign is swirling down the golden toilet.

    There’s no cavalry coming this time. No V-shaped recovery, vaccine, “hidden voters,” or any other deus ex machina that might miraculously allow him to make up the precious time and opportunity he has squandered for the last three-plus years. Changing campaign managers isn’t going to shake things up, and there won’t be a convention “bounce” to help, either. It just might all be over but the shouting. In his toothless threat this morning, Trump is admitting that the news isn’t fake and the polls aren’t bogus. That he’s going down in flames. Bigly. And this is also Trump trying to prearrange a scapegoat—in this case, mail-in ballots—for when he is assigned to history as a very bad one-term president.

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    If this is Trump conceding to the apparently inevitable, it’s also a dangerous time. People who are forced to finally admit imminent defeat are prone to outbursts and desperate behavior. When those people are the president, and especially this president, things can get dicey.

    It’s no coincidence that Trump’s tweet came on the same morning that the U.S. economy reported by far the worst quarter in American history, with a 32.9 percent contraction in GDP. That’s back-breaking news for a president whose case for re-election always hinged on a good economy.

    Now that economy is gone, and it won’t be coming back soon enough to save him—especially with some states allowing people to vote in September. Look at the polls, or think of some of the most effective campaign lines—”It’s the economy stupid!” or ”Are you better off now than you were four years ago?”—and it’s plain that he’s on the wrong side of every closing argument.

    It goes without saying that Trump cannot unilaterally change the election day. Thank God, that would take an act of Congress. We can be thankful that our system, imperfect as it may be, has built-in guardrails to help stop precisely this kind of power grab.

    None of this should take Trump off the hook for his authoritarian fantasies, or make you feel sorry for him. If the choice is between Trump’s political ambitions and the preservation of this great experiment, there isn’t much of a contest. That’s why Trump thinks it’s safe to send kids back to school amid a pandemic (that helps his re-election chances) but not safe enough to have an election on November 3 (that hurts his re-election chances).

    Coincidentally, Trump’s tweet also happened to come an hour before the news that Herman Cain, who’d been hospitalized with COVID-19 shortly after attending Trump’s disastrous Tulsa rally, had passed away.

    By the way, Trump’s tweet was predicted by none other than Joe Biden, who said, “Mark my words, I think he is going to try to kick back the election somehow.” At the time, some on the right called it a conspiracy theory and chided Biden for going there, proving the point that suggesting Trump will never stoop to a given level is always a thankless task; he will always make you regret it. His ability to go low is boundless. And it’s worth remembering that even if Trump is admitting to the evidently inevitable here, he’s still going to go down swinging.

    Trump’s tweet is an open invitation to wavering Republicans to finally jump ship. In recent days, I have noticed commentators like Rich Lowry and Erick Erickson (both originally Trump critics who sidled up to him after the election) create some distance and start to hedge their bets.

    Additionally, elected Republicans like Ted Cruz and Ben Sasse have suddenly rediscovered that spending and debt are bad. These maneuvers are, no doubt, aided by the fact that Trump looks destined to lose. Cruz and Marco Rubio on Thursday both immediately poured cold water on Trump’s tweet, as did Mitch McConnell. (Trump responded to that feedback by pinning his Tweet, and if Republicans are really serious here, this would also be the time to try and replace Trump on the ticket with someone who might, at the very least, save the U.S. Senate.)

    For the rest of us, it’s important to keep things in perspective. Trump said something truly shocking on Thursday. But it’s mostly shocking because it signals that even he can’t deny that the jig is finally up. It’s now just a matter of time.


  • https://www.washingtonpost.com…2-1ebf4e9d8e0d_story.html



    Born-again fiscal cuntservatives are sign of Trump’s weakening hand in Congress

    Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) calls the initial $1 trillion offering too expensive.Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) calls the initial $1 trillion offering too expensive. (Jonathan Newton/The Washington Post)


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    By Paul Kane

    July 29, 2020 at 2:26 p.m. PDT

    A growing number of Senate conservatives have provided the latest sign of President Trump’s weakening hand on Capitol Hill.

    From the presidentially ambitious Sens. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) and Josh Hawley (R-Mo.), to onetime deficit hawks like Sen. Patrick J. Toomey (R-Pa.), conservatives are abandoning the president as his top aides struggle with negotiations on a pandemic relief bill that is Trump’s last, best chance to pass legislation that could help his floundering reelection bid.

    Ignoring their own record of support for adding trillions of dollars to the national debt, these conservatives have signaled that they think, in a post-Trump Republican Party, that deficits will return to the forefront just as they did in the first years of the Obama administration.

    “We can’t just waste money. So I’m very concerned about the amount of money we’re talking about,” Sen. Rick Scott (R-Fla.) told reporters Tuesday after leaving a GOP huddle with White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin.

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    Those Trump advisers negotiated with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) for a week until they rolled out proposals that totaled $1 trillion, a figure that left Scott stumped.

    “A lot of money,” he said.

    Others washed their hands of the negotiations and said that Trump’s advisers would negotiate an even larger compromise with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), whose initial offering two months ago cost $3 trillion.

    “It’s a mess. I can’t figure out what this bill’s about,” Hawley said leaving the same meeting Tuesday. “This is not going to be the bill. They’re going to go negotiate with Pelosi. We have no idea what the final bill will be, and we’ll be the last to know.”

    And Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.), fresh off winning his primary, with Trump’s support, issued a detailed statement that accused the president of trying to use this legislation to save his own campaign, almost suggesting that he would rather Joe Biden win than add more debt.

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    “The White House is trying to solve bad polling by agreeing to indefensibly bad debt. This proposal is not targeted to fix precise problems — it’s about Democrats and Trumpers competing to outspend each other,” Sasse said.

    As pandemic limits scrutiny, GOP fears lesser-known Democratic candidates will steamroll to Senate majority

    This group generally supports a relatively modest bill that would reduce the enhanced unemployment benefit, from its current $600 per week to about $200, provide some additional help to small businesses and then grant liability protections to businesses, schools and nonprofit organizations from lawsuits related to the novel coronavirus as they try to reopen.

    Some Republicans have suggested a “skinny covid” relief package of extending a smaller unemployment benefit and negotiating the rest of the package in September, a position that Trump signaled support for Wednesday — but one that Pelosi and Democrats have uniformly rejected as insufficient for a national crisis.

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    Pelosi’s comments drip with sarcasm any time she fields a question about deficit-hawk Republicans, accusing them of hypocrisy given how they handled Trump’s first three years as president and their new budget concerns about $600 a week to the unemployed.

    “So, when they talk about $600, I want the review of the fact that they put $2 trillion onto the national debt to give a tax break to the wealthy, 83 percent of the benefits to the top 1 percent,” Pelosi said at a news conference Friday.

    She was referring to the 2017 tax cut that Sasse, Cruz and the other Republicans eagerly passed and sent to Trump for his signature.

    The debt, which grew from $20 trillion in Trump’s first year in office to more than $26 trillion this summer, has long receded as an issue that animated voters. Conservative groups that used to issue voting scorecards based on efforts to eliminate agencies like the Export-Import Bank lost relevance in recent years, as Republicans joined Democrats in gutting the last bit of spending restraint from a 2011 budget law.

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    When the pandemic took hold in March, Trump’s top advisers trekked to the Capitol with a directive that fiscal considerations didn’t matter.

    “The president has instructed his team to look very expansively at what we need to do and not be impeded by the potential price tag of what’s necessary here,” Eric Ueland, then Trump’s director of legislative affairs, told reporters at the time.

    About 10 days later, the Senate unanimously approved the more than $2 trillion Cares Act to try to help with the health and economic crises gripping the nation. A month later, the Senate approved, without a recorded vote, an additional $484 billion for small-business grants and assistance.

    Only two GOP conservatives, Sens. Mike Lee (Utah) and Rand Paul (Ky.), voiced any concern about the size of government spending at that point.

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    Throughout the early spring, Trump’s political standing remained strong — 49 percent of voters approved of his job performance in late March, vs. 45 percent who disapproved — but those numbers steadily dropped later in the spring and throughout the summer.

    That has left Republicans split into two camps, those up for reelection this year who are touting all this heavy spending to court voters and those looking beyond 2020.

    McConnell falls into the former camp, as he faces the voters this November against Amy McGrath, who remains an underdog but has already shattered state fundraising records. His campaign released an ad Tuesday that shows voters praising the 36-year incumbent for his work to approve the Paycheck Protection Act, designed to help small businesses.

    “Mitch is fighting for Kentucky jobs,” a barbecue owner says.

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    The calculus is clear: During a global pandemic, voters won’t care about the size of deficits if their lives and livelihood depend on government support.

  • Trump is done.


    He doesn't stand a chance.



    Chump has a serious uphill battle, his mouth is his worst enemy but beyond that:


    The stock market is off and even at the lower numbers horribly artificially inflated due to three things - the gubmint money flooding the stock market which will eventually dry up. The influx of all of the baseless money is devaluing every dollar in the country at a rate of over 4.5%/yr. Last because we have lost roughly 1/3 of our GDP. The evidence of the massive cheapening of the dollar is the fact that the price of gold has increased by a full third in the past year and by nearly 45% in the past 3 years. I tried to warn people here at the beginning of this shit what was coming down the pike.


    40,000,000 Americans are now unemployed in addition to the 'permanently unemployed'. Any other time besides a global pandemic, this would be rightfully called a depression.


    Riots and unrest in the street being funded and promoted by the communists, muslims and other enemies both foreign and domestic cannot do anything but hurt chumps chances because even though they are definitely not his fault, he is in the driver's seat and will be saddled with the blame.


    Likewise with the pandemic - again, not his fault, the only thing he could have done better was to keep his mouth shut - but he will take the hit for it.


    He has big tech and the media sealing his support off, messages are not going out except to his most dogmatic supporters, to all others, that support is effectively shadowbanned.


    Then let's not forget the biggie - mail in ballots coupled with the Soros' paid for secretary's of states who are the sole persons responsible for certifying elections.


    I ask you folks again to prepare for the 'fecal sandwich' which is coming. Move away from risky investments, Get rid of your debt, store food, ammo and get those around you to do the same. If I'm wrong, nothing I suggested will hurt you in any way

    No trees were killed in the posting of this bullshit, however, a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.

  • most Americans dislike Trump personally. Most Americans have benefitted from Trumps policies.


    Most Americans have suffered from the Leftist assault on our liberty and our economy on a personal level.


    Most Americans don't suffer TDS.


    Most Americans mistrust the media many recognize the media as the propaganda arm of the DNC a lesser number absolutely loathe the left and the media.


    Their exposure is making inroads into the mainstream being abused by leftist chicanery.


    November 3 looms.


    Then November 4

  • most Americans dislike Trump personally. Most Americans have benefitted from Trumps policies.

    NOT the 150,000 plus and MANY more to come who have died due to his incompetence in having a national strategy in controlling the covid 19 pandemic.

    Trump: “Leadership: Whatever happens, you’re responsible. If it doesn’t happen, you’re responsible.” 3:01PM Nov. 8 2013


    "Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power" ~ Abe Lincoln



  • Burn the cities, destroy the economy, what's next?

    Teflon is doing a pretty good job at that.

    Trump: “Leadership: Whatever happens, you’re responsible. If it doesn’t happen, you’re responsible.” 3:01PM Nov. 8 2013


    "Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power" ~ Abe Lincoln



  • Teflon is doing a pretty good job at that.

    HS my Canadian friend. We were dealing with record economic growth until the second quarter of this year when Pandemic Paranoia caused state and federal governments to shut down their economies. None of that will stick to Trump...

    Coercive collective action in the name of the greater good not only is immoral—who decides who has the gun?—it also is destructive of human happiness and ruinous of human potential.

  • HS my Canadian friend. We were dealing with record economic growth until the second quarter of this year when Pandemic Paranoia caused state and federal governments to shut down their economies. None of that will stick to Trump...

    Yes it will as he did nothing to stop the spread and has still not stopped the spread of the covid. His lack of leadership....

    Trump: “Leadership: Whatever happens, you’re responsible. If it doesn’t happen, you’re responsible.” 3:01PM Nov. 8 2013


    "Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power" ~ Abe Lincoln