Bye bye Confederate flag

  • BLM is really a tool of the just like the Antifa, they will be used by the Marxists to destroy America and then be purged out when the communists control the country.

    Don't worry, you elected a reality teevee host. What could possibly go wrong? :blowme

  • "The liberals get the bullet too."


    Sign seen at a riot...

    And Ruth said, "Intreat me not to leave thee, or to return from following after thee: for whither thou goest, I will go; and where thou lodgest, I will lodge: thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God. Where thou diest, will I die, and there will I be buried; the Lord do so to me, and more also, if ought but death part thee and me."

  • Dredsnocock. Did you even read what I said? The recall of Gray Davis took a while and it was a good fight. Of course I was thrilled to see that pile of shit go. Arnie promised really good things.... He had a list of really good things he was going to do when he got in. The contrast was enough to make anyone happy. I was extremely disappointed when he folded like a cheap card table under a fat lady.


    If he would have done even a fraction of the things he promised we might not be where we are now. That is pretty much why I can't listen to that fucker speak on any subject since then.


    lazs

    "Don't let it end like this. Tell them I said something."



    Pancho Villa, last words (1877 - 1923)

  • Book burners are kinda creepy twat. I sometimes feel I am living in a bad Ayn Rand novel these days when I hear dems speak.


    lazs

    "Don't let it end like this. Tell them I said something."



    Pancho Villa, last words (1877 - 1923)

  • Ayn Rand was a prophet....of sorts.

    And Ruth said, "Intreat me not to leave thee, or to return from following after thee: for whither thou goest, I will go; and where thou lodgest, I will lodge: thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God. Where thou diest, will I die, and there will I be buried; the Lord do so to me, and more also, if ought but death part thee and me."

  • Don't worry, you elected a reality teevee host. What could possibly go wrong? :blowme

    If you are a communist you will think everything went right, until the first progrom.


    Then you will say, Who will save us, but there will be no one left to save you, it is the end.


    Go vote for biden and and and that other thing, come on man.

  • https://www.newsobserver.com/n…cal/article243661027.html


    Protesters remove 2 Confederate statues from Capitol, hanging 1 from Raleigh lightpost



    Two Confederate statues atop a monument on the Capitol grounds in Raleigh, NC were pulled down by protesters on Juneteenth, June 19, 2020. One was hung from a street light, the other was dragged to the doorstep of the old Wake County courthouse. BY JULIA WALL

    Protesters pulled down the bronze soldiers on the 75-foot Confederate monument at the state Capitol Friday night, then hung the statue of a cavalryman by its neck from a streetlight.

    The other statue, an artilleryman, was dragged through the streets to the Wake County courthouse, and later carried away by police in a golf cart.

    At one point, a protester pressed a knee into the neck of the statue at the courthouse, a reference to George Floyd, who died May 25 after a Minneapolis police officer took the same position for more than eight minutes. Protesters put a Black Lives Matter sign listing the names of black people killed by police on the statue’s chest.

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    Crews remove Confederate monuments in Raleigh a day after<br>protesters topple statues


    Crews remove Confederate monuments in Raleigh a day afterprotesters topple statues Crews remove Confederate monuments in Raleigh a day after protesters topple statues

    Before dark, protesters had wrapped yellow rope around the necks of the figures, but police intervened. Officers removed the ropes and then cleared out after about a half hour, allowing protesters to mount the base of the 125-year-old memorial to Confederate soldiers and sailors.

    As a protester climbed up to where the statues stood, another group approached the scene and tried to convince people not to take the statues down. That lead to some skirmishes.

    On top of the monument, the protester rocked one statue, then the other, back and forth as hundreds of protesters shouted encouragement from the ground.

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    Minutes later, the demonstrators looped an orange strap around the statues and pulled.

    This time, the statues fell to the ground.

    Earlier in the day, groups convened in Raleigh and Durham to celebrate Juneteenth, the commemoration of the end of slavery in the United States, and to remind politicians that demands for true equality for African Americans remain unmet.

    “It’s very significant that we tie together Juneteenth and the current climate of what’s going on right now,” said Raleigh Demands Justice organizer Kerwin Pittman, referencing the protests that have rocked cities across the country since George Floyd was killed by police.

    “We really must tie those things together because it’s the same thing yesterday as it is today. We’re still fighting for liberation. We’re still fighting for emancipation from a racist, biased criminal justice system.”

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    Police arrested at least one person in connection with the effort to bring down the statues Friday.

    Play VideoDuration 1:15

    Protesters attempt to pull down Confederate statues in Raleigh

    After hours of different demonstrations were held throughout the day in downtown Raleigh in celebration of Juneteenth on Friday, June 19, 2020, some protesters tied ropes around two Confederate statues at the Capitol and attempted to pull them down. BY ROBERT WILLETT

    MONUMENTS REMOVED ACROSS THE COUNTRY

    Raleigh is not the first city to see monuments representing white supremacy downed by protesters. In recent years, Confederate monuments have been toppled by protesters in Durham and Chapel Hill.

    In Richmond, Virginia, last week, protesters pulled down a statue of Jefferson Davis, the president of the Confederacy, from its pedestal and dragged it across historic Monument Avenue.

    Protesters hang one of the statues pulled from the Confederate monument at the State Capitol at the intersection of Salisbury and Hargett Streets in Raleigh on Juneteenth, Friday, June 19, 2020. Travis Long [email protected]

    In Montgomery, Alabama, protesters removed a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee outside a school bearing his name.

    Protesters have taken down statues of historical figures not related to the Confederacy too. In Boston, Massachusetts, a statue of Christopher Columbus was beheaded. Protesters in Portland, Oregon, toppled a statue of George Washington.

    In England, protesters threw a statue of a slave trader into the river.

    Some governments have moved to take down statues and monuments before protesters could get to it.

    In Louisville, Kentucky, for example, a statue of Confederate officer John Breckinridge Castleman was taken down after a judge ruled that the city was allowed to do so.

    Some North Carolina cities have recently voted to remove Confederate monuments, but state lawmakers passed a law in 2015 that made it illegal to remove monuments from public property in most cases.

    Among the removals stymied by the law was the 1895 monument that protesters stripped of two statues on Friday night.

    Gov. Roy Cooper proposed relocating that monument, along with two others on Capitol grounds, in 2017.

    Protesters drag a figure pulled from the Confederate monument at the State Capitol down Salisbury Street in Raleigh on Juneteenth, Friday, June 19, 2020. Travis Long [email protected]

    IN RALEIGH, A MARCH AND A PARTY

    Protest events in Raleigh started around noon Friday outside Duke Energy Center. People played music and read poetry before Taari Coleman, an organizer with NC BORN, a group that describes its aim as dismantling all oppression, took the mic to address what was on many people’s minds: her arrest the night before.

    Coleman and a minor were taken into police custody during a march in downtown Raleigh along McDowell Street. Police Chief Cassandra Deck-Brown said in a news conference Friday that charges would not be pursued against the two after reviewing videos posted to social media and body-camera footage. The incident was initially reported as an assault on an officer, Deck-Brown said.

    Coleman didn’t provide her account before the crowd Friday, but she said it was good that no one was in jail and no one had been hurt.

    “There’s a really weird, somber mood out,” she said, and the crowd reflected that. People passed around Sharpie pens to write the number of the North Carolina National Lawyers Guild on their arms in case of arrest, and a guild attorney gave the group a short “Know Your Rights” talk.

    Once the 75 or so people who had gathered began marching to the Executive Mansion, the mood began to lift.

    Protesters surround a Raleigh Police officer in his vehicle on Fayetteville Street on Friday, June 19, 2020 in Raleigh, N.C. Robert Willett [email protected]

    Protesters danced to a revamped version of the now-familiar “No justice! No peace!” chant. They have made near-nightly appearances in Raleigh’s streets since May 30, calling for drastic changes to policing and an end to white supremacy.

    In front of the mansion, Lauren Howell, an organizer with NC BORN, spoke about the obstacles facing North Carolina voters.

    “Republicans right now are trying to cut the number of early voting days,” Howell said, “trying to cut the number of polling locations.”

    A woman in the crowd called out several times that “no vote is a vote for Trump.”

    The crowd swelled as marchers kept moving, reaching about 150 people by the time they arrived in front of the Wake County courthouse, where Howell spoke to the crowd about cultural appropriation.

    Protesters celebrate with one of the confederate statues pulled down from the N.C. State Capitol grounds Friday night, June 19, 2020. Ben Sessoms [email protected]

    “When you think about freedom and when you think about blackness, I want you to think about the fact that Black people contribute and create American culture,” she said.

    Howell said that words like “ratchet” and “ghetto” were used against her in a derogatory way, but they have been co-opted and made into trends without people understanding what they mean.

    In front of the courthouse, Raleigh-Apex NAACP president Gerald D. Givens Jr. described being racially profiled by a group of law enforcement officers while shopping at an Old Navy store.

    “To our law enforcement agents, no matter what agency that you work in, we know that you a human being too,” Givens said. “But when you see us, recognize that we’re human too.”

    Rain caused a temporary lull in the action, but by around 6:30 p.m., roughly 200 people were gathered near the intersection of Bragg and Bloodworth for an event that felt more like a party.

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    IN DURHAM, A MESSAGE MEMORIALIZED IN PAINT

    About 500 protesters met in front of the Durham police headquarters, where some people had been camping out to protest increased spending on law enforcement. They painted the word “defund” on the asphalt in giant yellow letters.

    The word is a reference to a growing movement across the country to shift resources from police departments into social programs such as education and mental health services.

    Organizers from BYP100 called on the City Council to “invest in community and divest in the police.”

    Near a series of tents, protesters set up a handwashing station. The smell of hamburgers wafted from the grill. Children swung at a piñata.

    “This is a day of mourning and-or celebration,” Marcella Camara, a member of Spirithouse, a black organizing group that has developed an alternative to policing called “harm-free zones,” said while taking a break from painting the “defund” mural.

    “It’s a reminder for black people that we are beautiful. We have all we need to get free. We have all we need to take care of our communities.”

    Organizers led the crowd in call and response chants.

    “I love being black,” the crowd called back. “I love the color of my skin. It is the skin that I’m in. I love the texture of my hair. I rock it everywhere.”

    In front of the jail, protesters called out a message to the people held inside. “We see you, we love you,” they chanted.

  • “Every record has been destroyed or falsified, every book rewritten, every picture has been repainted, every statue and street building has been renamed, every date has been altered. And the process is continuing day by day and minute by minute. History has stopped. Nothing exists except an endless present in which the Party is always right.” - 1984

  • What a bunch of heroes, with their little black suits and faces hidden by masks...

    And Ruth said, "Intreat me not to leave thee, or to return from following after thee: for whither thou goest, I will go; and where thou lodgest, I will lodge: thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God. Where thou diest, will I die, and there will I be buried; the Lord do so to me, and more also, if ought but death part thee and me."

  • The fourth of July should be interesting. Several biker groups have vowed to take CHAZ back from Antifa on that date and present it as a gift to the nation....

    And Ruth said, "Intreat me not to leave thee, or to return from following after thee: for whither thou goest, I will go; and where thou lodgest, I will lodge: thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God. Where thou diest, will I die, and there will I be buried; the Lord do so to me, and more also, if ought but death part thee and me."