63 cases in the US.

  • Ok.... so my buddy comes over and brings me this powder drink in individual packets... 50 to a box. It has C D3 and zinc and that other crap they say we should have. He tells me..... best to just put it in two fingers of water and slam it down then wash down with clear water. He is correct.... that shit is nasty tasting! Raspberry my ass! Says he is gonna bring by some other stuff too. His wife is the one who is the nurse.


    lazs

    "Don't let it end like this. Tell them I said something."



    Pancho Villa, last words (1877 - 1923)

  • https://www.breitbart.com/clip…de-for-political-reasons/



    Rand Paul: Under Socialized Medicine, Decisions Like Biden Changing Distribution of Antibodies Get Made ‘for Political Reasons’

    2
    IAN HANCHETT17 Sep 202156
    1:21

    On Friday’s broadcast of the Fox News Channel’s “Hannity,” Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) said that the Biden administration’s change to the distribution of monoclonal antibodies “could be that they think there are more deplorable people in Florida, more Republicans or more of the unvaccinated unwashed.” And that under socialized medicine, “decisions will be made for political reasons.”

    Paul said, [relevant remarks begin around 3:45] “Realize this is the difference between socialized medicine and capitalism. Under capitalism, when there’s increased demand, and Florida has increased demand right now, you increase the supply. Supply matches demand in capitalism. In socialism, you have political reasons. So, it could be that they think there are more deplorable people in Florida, more Republicans or more of the unvaccinated unwashed. And so, decisions will be made for political reasons. But if this were capitalism and this were going out into the marketplace, the companies would be ramping up production and it would be distributed where it’s needed.”

  • There are so many in this country who don't even know what integrity is, much less value it.


    Under Trump it was necessarily bad. Under Biden everything is good. They do not see the hypocrisy in that. That's a real problem.

  • Ohh get ready for shortages...


    https://www.ccjdigital.com/wor…employee-recruitment-woes



    1. WORKFORCE
    2. HEALTH & WELLNESS


    Majority of drivers say they would resist vaccine, COVID testing requirements from fleets

    Tom Quimby, CCJ senior editorJason Cannon, CCJ chief editor

    Aug 2, 2021
    Updated Aug 26, 2021

    truck driver with a mask
    According to a recent CCJ survey, carriers are anxious to bring back employees that had been working remotely since the onsite of the pandemic, but but only 2% of respondents said vaccination status would play a role.

    Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine this week was approved by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) for people 16 and older – a key hurdle for nearly 30% of adults who have yet to take a single dose. A recent poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) found that three in ten unvaccinated adults claimed they would be more likely to get vaccinated if one of the vaccines currently authorized for emergency use were to receive full approval from the FDA.

    The Pfizer vaccine first received emergency use authorization in December last year. The more contagious COVID-19 Delta variant is spreading quickly according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and as of last week, the average number of daily cases had reached levels not seen since February. About 70% of all those eligible have received at least one shot, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and around 60% are fully vaccinated.

    Carriers looking to shield their employees from resurgent COVID-19 cases while striving to step up recruiting efforts during a labor shortage need to exercise caution, experts say, otherwise they risk losing people to ill-advised health policies instead. Businesses can also impose their own vaccine and mask-wearing policies, according to Veriforce Master Trainer James Junkin, so long as they don’t conflict with any laws.

    [Related: CDC recommending masks again, trucking volumes should remain strong]

    Some companies have already rolled out mandatory vaccination policies for their employees including Walmart, Walt Disney, Google, Facebook and Uber according to The New York Times. Wednesday Delta Air Lines became the first public company to levy a penalty, imposing a $200 monthly surcharge beginning Nov. 1 on unvaccinated employees that are enrolled in Delta’s account-based healthcare plan "to address the financial risk the decision to not vaccinate is creating for our company," Delta CEO Ed Bastian said in a memo to employees. Effective immediately, unvaccinated employees are required to wear masks in all indoor Delta settings.

    “The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has published various pieces upholding the rights of employers to mandate a vaccine under federal law with the exceptions being for those employees who refuse vaccinations because of a disability or a sincerely held religious belief,” Junkin said.

    Companies should “contact qualified legal counsel before,” implementing a vaccine mandate, Junkin said.

    “While the federal authorities are upholding an employer's right to mandate the vaccine with the exceptions that are noted, various states are moving quickly to enact legislation to prevent employers from mandating vaccinations for COVID-19,” Junkin said. “While the employer may be compliant and legal in its actions on the federal level, an employer could be violating employee rights under state law.”

    In addition, some employees may legally challenge an employer’s vaccination policy or quit.

    “Employees may decide to resign from their positions and recruitment efforts suffer because of a vaccine mandate,” Junkin added.

    According to a recent CCJ survey, carriers are anxious to bring back employees that had been working remotely since the onsite of the pandemic, but but only 2% of respondents said vaccination status would play a role.


    'High-risk industry' issue

    Almost half of all fleets responding to a recent CCJ survey say they no longer have any employees remaining remote, and only 18% plan to allow home-based employees to stay there indefinitely. Collectively, 26% of respondents expect to have all remote employees back in the office by the end of the year, but only 2% said vaccination status would play a role.Almost half of all fleets responding to a recent CCJ survey say they no longer have any employees remaining remote, and only 18% plan to allow home-based employees to stay there indefinitely. Collectively, 26% of respondents expect to have all remote employees back in the office by the end of the year, but only 2% said vaccination status would play a role.Though COVID’s rising infection rates and the resulting mask mandates have pushed the virus back to the top of the mainstream news cycle, it’s not figuring too prominently on the minds of drivers according to WorkHound CEO and co-founder Max Farrell.

    “Comments around COVID have made up less than 1% of all feedback we have received at WorkHound this year,” said Farrell, whose company provides carriers with app-based, anonymous driver feedback.. “In the feedback we received, the sentiment was mostly negative about everything pandemic related. And the sentiments range across the board. Some drivers are wanting companies to do more to support vaccines and others are wanting the companies to stay out of it.”

    Junkin advised that companies carefully assess the level of risk the coronavirus poses before implementing any policies to address it.

    “Unless the industry is considered to be a high-risk industry, such as the healthcare industry, it is recommended that employers institute a voluntary vaccination program that is supported by management involvement and a comprehensive educational program in lieu of a mandate,” Junkin said. “Employers seeking to institute a mandated vaccination program are suggested to contact qualified legal counsel before doing so.”

    Instead of requiring vaccinations, some companies have been offering incentives to encourage employees to get vaccinated, an approach that Junkin said shouldn’t be taken lightly. According to KFF, about three-quarters of workers whose employers encourage getting a vaccine (73%) – or offer paid time off to do so (75%) – said they have gotten at least one shot – significantly more than the share whose employers don’t openly encourage vaccination (41%) or don’t offer paid time off (51%).

    “While companies may choose to incentivize vaccinations, it must be done in a manner that is not discriminatory to workers that are protected by federal or state laws,” Junkin cautioned.

    For employees who do not get vaccinated, "a reasonable accommodation might be continued mask wearing, wearing of appropriate respiratory protection such as an N-95, or working from home," Junkin said.

    While there are risks in implementing a COVID program, doing nothing, Junkin said, isn’t much of an option.

    "In the short term, companies that mandate vaccines and masking programs may experience higher than average employee turnover and longer times to fill vacancies with qualified workers,” Junkin said. “Whether through an employer sponsored volunteer vaccination program or a mandated one, the long-term benefits of a safe and healthy workforce necessitate that employer's promote vaccination. For employers that choose inaction, deadly consequences may await their employees and subsequently their businesses.”


    Fleet management likely to face pushback

    Vaccine mandates have filtered in for weeks, and within hours of Pfizer's FDA approval Monday President Joe Biden urged private companies to require employees to get vaccinated.

    While such a move would no doubt be controversial at the fleet level, it's certain to be unpopular with drivers.

    "Not happening," Adam Dille, a driver for Youngstown, Ohio-based bulk hauler R&J Trucking Company, said of his carrier theoretically requiring a COVID-19 vaccine. "I'd have to quit."

    Roy Weamer, also a driver at R&J Trucking, said while the carrier didn't require vaccination, the company "highly encourages it."

    "It would not matter to me because I got it back in April when I was eligible to receive it," he added, "but the company that we supply made it part of their PPE. Since the vaccination is part of their PPE, they can legally fire anyone who does not get it. They told their workers get it or get another job. They also said if 75% of their employees got it by a certain date, those employees would get a $3,000 bonus. All of the ones that were so defiant and dead set against it are now vaccinated."

    "It will never happen," added Anthony Kostelic, an Ohio-based flatbed driver for TMC Transportation said of taking a mandated vaccine.

    In a driver market that skews heavily on the demand-side, many drivers said they would walk over being forced to decide between taking a vaccination versus losing their job or face regular testing. Responding to a poll this week by CCJ sister publication Truckers News, 30% of company drivers said they would refuse a mandatory vaccine and force the employer to fire them. Another nearly 17% said they would claim a medical or religious exemption, while 16% said they would quit. Almost 7% said they would comply and get the vaccine. About 25% of drivers polled said they had already been vaccinated.

    It's human resources policies and decisions like these that has Byrl Derrick thankful that he's owner and operator of Crossville, Alabama-based Helping Hands Truck'n.

    "I work for me," he said, "and neither one of us are getting it."

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  • What the National Influenza Immunization Program (NIIP) did not and could not survive, however, was the second blow, finding cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) among persons receiving swine flu immunizations. As of 1976, >50 "antecedent events" had been identified in temporal relationship to GBS, events that were considered as possible factors in its cause. The list included viral infections, injections, and "being struck by lightning." Whether or not any of the antecedents had a causal relationship to GBS was, and remains, unclear.


    When cases of GBS were identified among recipients of the swine flu vaccines, they were, of course, well covered by the press. Because GBS cases are always present in the population, the necessary public health questions concerning the cases among vaccine recipients were "Is the number of cases of GBS among vaccine recipients higher than would be expected? And if so, are the increased cases the result of increased surveillance or a true increase?"


    Leading epidemiologists debated these points, but the consensus, based on the intensified surveillance for GBS (and other conditions) in recipients of the vaccines, was that the number of cases of GBS appeared to be an excess.


    Had H1N1 influenza been transmitted at that time, the small apparent risk of GBS from immunization would have been eclipsed by the obvious immediate benefit of vaccine-induced protection against swine flu. However, in December 1976, with >40 million persons immunized and no evidence of H1N1 transmission, federal health officials decided that the possibility of an association of GBS with the vaccine, however small, necessitated stopping immunization, at least until the issue could be explored.


    A moratorium on the use of the influenza vaccines was announced on December 16; it effectively ended NIIP of 1976.

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  • People who make reports to the VAERS system have the freedom to report the event however they choose. They write a narrative about what happened from their perspective. The VAERS system launched in 1990 as a co-sponsored program from the Centers for Disease Control and the Food and Drug Administration. Patients have reported hundreds of thousands of events that they believe are related to vaccines.


    Health care professionals can file reports too. In fact, vaccine recipients only make approximately seven percent of the reports. The vast majority of the reports come from vaccine manufacturers, health care providers and state immunization systems.

    Martha Sharan, spokesperson for the CDC, says that they take reports without screening them for causality. They have their own investigators that review the reports as a whole to consider whether there are potential safety issues with any available vaccines. They neither confirm nor deny the suggestion that the vaccine caused the reported adverse event. They say that some of the events are just coincidence.


    One person made a report that mentioned the Hulk. The person vaccinated said they felt like they were becoming the Hulk after getting a vaccine. The person making the report, Dr. Jams R. Laidler, said that he made the report to show that reports to VAERS are not verified: “The chief problem with the VAERS data is that reports can be entered by anyone and are not routinely verified. To demonstrate this, a few years ago I entered a report that an influenza vaccine had turned me into The Hulk.”


    Dr. Laidler said that a representative from VAERS contacted him about the report, and he later agreed to delete it from the system. He said his case made the point that anyone can report anything to the system. He said he made the report in the early 2000’s. The CDC says that Dr. Laidler’s Hulk report really happened.


    You can't look at the raw data from VEARS and come to a reliable conclusion.

  • AAOBvWE.img?h=768&w=1080&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f

    Trump: “Leadership: Whatever happens, you’re responsible. If it doesn’t happen, you’re responsible.” 3:01PM Nov. 8 2013

    "Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power" ~ Abe Lincoln

    tRump is the Master of the Con with 70 years of practice/experience. It is sad that so many supposedly intelligent and educated people fall for his cons.

    DJ Trump: while I support the Dems, if I ran I would run as a Republican because those people are easy to fool.


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