"Those jobs aren't coming back"

  • That really is the clip they should show everytime some idiot says that the current economy is a monkey boy recovery....


    Look... for 8 years consumer confidence was at an all time low... companies were not confident about their future... how can there be any recovery under those circumstances?


    lazs

    "Don't let it end like this. Tell them I said something."



    Pancho Villa, last words (1877 - 1923)

  • Quit messin with the Libatrds with FACTS! You know they will go apeshit.

    Rock-Ribbed Capitalist

    No amount of evidence will ever persuade an idiot - Mark Twain

    TWAT on 10/14/2019 :

    Lemme say that again... I don't care. If. The accusations against Trump. Are factual. Or not.

  • I would but what else can you say when they tell you that it took 8 years for us to get over the Bush depression and now the Trumpster is reaping the bennies.


    lazs

    "Don't let it end like this. Tell them I said something."



    Pancho Villa, last words (1877 - 1923)

  • They need to come up with a relevant mid-size bike.....and mebbe ACT like they give a fuck about their customers with older bikes

    If politicians only got paid according to their district's economic success, there would be no more Democrats.

  • Actually you would be wrong to a certain extent. When I rode Harley was a niche market. those who 'dressed like a pirate' were not welcomed with open arms. the huge influx of guys your age buying em who had never had a bike before was just mid life crisis shit. I have always had a few Harleys... Always old... always clunkers.... and I dress the same way I did then... cowboy boots... levis... Tshirt and maybe a pendelton or a leather jacket. In fact... I uses to wear Raybans.... Now I wear Raybans but they are prescription...


    Harley has never cared about me or my ilk... I have never cared about them. I won't set foot in a Harley dealership.


    lazs

    "Don't let it end like this. Tell them I said something."



    Pancho Villa, last words (1877 - 1923)

  • They have really nice $50 Tshirts


    LEGACY....that's the word I was searching for. I can understand them not having parts for the Pan, but they scarce have anything for the '99 road king either, save a VERY over-priced rear tyre to get it to pass inspection

    If politicians only got paid according to their district's economic success, there would be no more Democrats.

  • To pass what? seriously.. you can build a Harley with not one Harley part.


    Not to mention... with all the mid life crisis guys losing interest... you can have a few geezer glide spares laying around for cheap.


    lazs

    "Don't let it end like this. Tell them I said something."



    Pancho Villa, last words (1877 - 1923)

  • save a VERY over-priced rear tyre to get it to pass inspection

    My day one could use a VW Bug tire and it would fit. On the rear anyhoo.

    Rock-Ribbed Capitalist

    No amount of evidence will ever persuade an idiot - Mark Twain

    TWAT on 10/14/2019 :

    Lemme say that again... I don't care. If. The accusations against Trump. Are factual. Or not.

  • you guys are probly right. The name still has some pull even to those who pretend to not like em... sorta like a Colt 1911


    lazs

    "Don't let it end like this. Tell them I said something."



    Pancho Villa, last words (1877 - 1923)

  • I rode the Harley "street" bikes when I went for a rider refresher course last year. I really don't like them. I wasn't really a Buell fan, either.


    The root problem of the Harley sales slump is the market shrinking. The wannabes that jumped on board are now looking for the next new thing. So not only are they not buying new, but they're dumping their bikes, so the used market is flooded. Same thing happens with any fad.


    Honestly, complaining about a lack of factory support for a 20 year old discontinued model is kind of weak. The truth is, manufacturers are only required to keep parts on hand for only 10 years after the model production ceases. After that, it's a matter of good will and whether it makes business sense.


    Harley sales are dropping, and honestly, there's not much they can do about it, the market itself is shrinking. They're having to cut costs everywhere.


    I'm looking for another bike, as soon as the house deal is done and things get calm. Might be a new 115th anniversary Breakout 114, might be a used CVO Pro Street Breakout.

  • Actually they don't keep parts for anything past about 5 years old it seems... they have a parts counter that is half the size of the Harley handbag section...


    Thing is.. they never wanted anything to do with me and my ilk from day one.


    lazs

    "Don't let it end like this. Tell them I said something."



    Pancho Villa, last words (1877 - 1923)

  • OOOOOkkkkk....rising blue collar wages are hurting the economy?


    http://www.breitbart.com/2018-…ages-are-economic-threat/


    Rising wages for blue-collar truckers are a threat to the nation’s economy, says Jeff Bezos’ Washington Post.

    “The challenges facing the industry, including trucking companies rapidly raising prices as they raise wages, have special power to affect the entire economy,” writes Heather Long.


    Her article, headlined, “America’s severe trucker shortage could undermine the prosperous economy,” continued:


    delivery delays are common, and businesses such as Amazon, General Mills and Tyson Foods are raising prices as they pass higher transportation costs along to consumers. On a recent call with investors, a Walmart executive called rising transportation costs the company’s primary “head wind.”

    The gains for employees are a novel pain for the investors and employers who have been able to hold down wages for decades because the federal government is trying to grow the economy via cheap-labor legal immigration.


    The unexpected rise in wages is also a problem for Jeff Bezos, the billionaire owner of the Washington Post whose Amazon retail empire depends on cheap truck transport. His business is already facing higher warehouse costs because the nation’s 800,000 warehouse workers have won a 9.4 percent pay increases since January 2017.


    The Post‘s author admits that companies are being forced to compete for labor in a good economy, but hides the role played by President Donald Trump who has thwarted intense efforts by business lobbies and bipartisan alliances to import more foreign workers:


    As the nation faces a historically low level of unemployment, trucking companies are doing what economists have said firms need to do to attract and retain workers: They’re hiking pay significantly, offering bonuses and even recruiting people they previously wouldn’t have considered …

    The political fight over imported cheap-labor is a see-saw battle.


    Congress has blocked Trump’s pro-American reforms and is trying to preserve the inflow of Central American workers via the nation’s loose asylum laws.


    But Trump has used his legal authority to curb illegal immigration over the Mexican border, sharply lowered the inflow of workers via the refugee agencies, and has minimized the growth of the guest-worker programs. He has also blocked a business push in Congress for another amnesty of ‘dreamers’ and other illegals, as well as for a huge expansion in the number of guest-workers.

    Trump’s opposition has forced business groups to lower their amnesty goals down to just 1.8 million illegals. House Speaker Paul Ryan pushed that medium-sized amnesty goal in June but was blocked by 112 GOP House legislators.


    That is a huge change from 2013 when business groups worked with Democratic and GOP Senators to push the “Gang of Eight” cheap-labor-and-amnesty bill. That bill would have delivered roughly 30 million legal immigrants by 2023 and shifted more of the nation’s annual income towards Wall Street.


    Without more imported workers in Trump’s fast-growing economy, employers are being forced to compete for the current supply of working Americans, sidelined Americans, and the regular inflow of legal immigrants and guest-workers. The Post admitted:


    There’s only one option right now for most trucking companies: Give substantial raises. Recruiters who show up daily at TDDS [a truck-driving school] are offering jobs that pay $60,000 to $70,000, with full benefits and a $4,000 signing bonus.

    The Post noted those wages are simply not enough to win enough recruits, partly because trucking is tough career:


    Trucking jobs require people to leave their families for weeks at a time and live in a small “cabin” with a hard bed. Divorces are common, veteran drivers say, and their children forget them. A life on the road is often costly and unhealthy. Drivers sit for hours a day in diesel trucks and pull into truck stops that typically serve greasy hot dogs and chili.

    Yet the Post portrayed the long-delayed rise in truckers’ salaries as a threat to employers and investors:


    the industry simply can’t find a way to move goods as fast and cheaply as they have in the past. This logjam will be especially perilous, economists say, if competition for truckers pushes up prices so quickly that the country faces uncontrolled inflation, which can easily lead to a recession.
    “This is slowing down the economy already,” said Peter Boockvar, chief investment officer at Bleakley Advisory Group. “If it takes me a week instead of two days to ship products from point A to B, I’m losing potential business.”

    The newspaper headlined the article “Trucker shortage poses economic threat.”


    The online headline was “America’s severe trucker shortage could undermine the prosperous economy.”


    Four million Americans turn 18 each year and begin looking for good jobs in the free market — but the government provides green cards to roughly 1 million legal immigrants and temporary work-permits to roughly 3 million foreign workers.


    The Washington-imposed economic policy of economic growth via mass-immigration shifts wealth from young people towards older people by flooding the market with foreign labor. That process spikes profits and Wall Street values by cutting salaries for manual and skilled labor offered by blue-collar and white-collar employees. The policy also drives up real estate prices, widens wealth-gaps, reduces high-tech investment, increases state and local tax burdens, hurts kids’ schools and college education, pushes Americans away from high-tech careers, and sidelines at least 5 million marginalized Americans and their families, including many who are now struggling with opioid addictions.


    That cheap-labor economic strategy has stalled wage-growth since the 1960s:

    Screen-Shot-2017-09-13-at-12.02.41-AM.png


    Trump’s campaign to limit legal and illegal immigration is driving up wages and salaries for Americans in various locations and careers around the country. The beneficiaries include new employees, African-American bakers in Chicago, Latino restaurant workers in Monterey, Calif., disabled people nationwide, high schoolers,  resort workers in Hilton Head, construction workers, Superbowl workers, the garment industry, and workers at small businesses, and even Warren Buffett’s railroad workers.

    If politicians only got paid according to their district's economic success, there would be no more Democrats.

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