Rhonda quit the MMA scene just in time.

  • Iron. define get better? get the next color belt? LOL.... some people have an instinct that can't be taught. Simple as that. Learning to score points without harming anyone is not a good way to learn to street fight. In truth? there is no training for street fighting.


    fake indian? I knew you were gonna make something out of nothing. It is not a class on how to pay down your mortgage. It is serious shit where people get hurt or worse. Even when you make rules? The boxer beats the shit out of the martial arts 'master' every fucking time. Real world..... in my opinion..... is even worse. The same thinking that says a 90 lb girl can kick the crap out of 5 200 lb men (cause they do it in the movies) is the kind of thinking that says because you danced in a martial arts ring for a few nights a week for years and have your lavender belt you can survive a bar fight.


    lazs

    "Don't let it end like this. Tell them I said something."



    Pancho Villa, last words (1877 - 1923)

  • Was why I made the distinction. My Dad taught me to box when I was 4. I was a good fighter, instinct. I still have quick reflexes and could still fight if I had to but my joints aren't what they used to be. I'd probably die in pain after a fight.

  • If you train in Boxing or Karate a couple hours a day 3-4 times a week you are going to get stronger and your punches/kicks will become more instinctual whether you have a natural talent for it or not. If you never did that then how can you know what I'm saying is true or not?

  • One thing Karate taught me that boxing never did. I was sparring a guy in the dojo once, we had pads and helmets on that had a metal grill in front. Full contact otherwise. He was taller than me and had reach on me. Coincidentally he was black. He was keeping me at bay with his reach. I jumped into him, never would have done that boxing, and punched hard to his face. He got a hand between my fist and the metal grate. Hurt his hand and ended the session. I almost felt bad about it. ;)

  • Sure thing ringaling.....


    You dont have a leg to stand on so wtf are you going on about?


    I boxed for years then took up pajama dancing to stay fit and to have something to do. Sure I spent a few years doing it and danced around the ring but no one is as tough as you,cause you say so....bloviated blowhard.


    Unlike you I aint proud for some of the stupid shit I've done I dont need to brag about bullshit to FEEL manly as you seem to have to.


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  • Uh oh.... pissed off the fake indian. Everyone got taught how to box when they were kids by someone somewhere. I actually did not even try till high school. I boxed sportsman for about a year after and got beat to shit but still did ok. I had already found out a street fight is nothing like boxing. I have no idea how many real fights I have been in. I know that I was in at least half a dozen in the 8th grade cause... that is what they called my dad about. Bar fights and fights at biker events? I don't know. too many.


    Never get mad. never break your hands. Always try to end it as quick as you can. Use any unyielding object to smash their head into. Stay on your feet if you can. That is the advise this old 'blowhard' gives. your mileage may vary


    lazs

    "Don't let it end like this. Tell them I said something."



    Pancho Villa, last words (1877 - 1923)

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  • There was a time when they sold "Father Son" boxing sets in every sporting goods store in the country.


    I was thinking of these:

    70s Socker Boppers!: nostalgia


    And apparently, they still make them?!

    Big Time Toys Socker Bopper (Colors May Vary)

    Kind of surprises me this hasn't been turned into someone's crusade.

    Brauno in a previous life, followed by LTARget. E25280 on the Forum.

    SWtarget in last AH in game incarnation.

    "Proudly drawing fire so my brothers may pass unharmed."

    Brauno in World of Tanks.

    "What is, is. What was, will be. What will be, was, but will be again." - Horseshack from Welcome Back Kotter

  • Boxing Fight Gloves were introduced to reduce horrific eye injuries from fingers mainly. Fight gloves are very very small and honestly they don't offer very much in the way of hand protection. The wraps underneath offer much more protection to your hands.


    Most people will never get their hands on actual fight gloves as they are not sold in sporting good stores. Very few boxers ever bother buying them as they are very expensive, and are of very little use in training (they are not durable if used as bag gloves longterm and they give almost no protection). The biggest safety feature is the small sewn tab that attaches the end of the thumb to the main glove - this makes it almost impossible to thumb someone in the eye. This is a 1980s safety improvement, and it has reduced eye injuries dramatically.


    Fight gloves are 8oz or 10oz. There are Traditional style fight gloves, and Mexican style fight gloves. Mexican fight gloves put more padding on the backs and less on the knuckles. The cuff is a little longer to give more hand support. They hit the hardest - you can actually feel the knuckles through the padding. I always thought of fight gloves as gardening gloves - that's how small and light they feel. Oh and there's "International" style gloves as well - those are more square and wide on the back of the glove, and offer more area to cover up with. There's a little less padding on the knuckles because of this.


    Fight gloves are meant to be single use and disposable.


    Sparring gloves are much bigger and more padded than fight gloves (14oz, 16oz, 18oz), and that's what you find in stores, or in a boxer's gym bag. The other gloves are bag gloves - while closer in size to fight gloves, they are more protective that fight gloves and are almost indestructible. The best ones IMHO are the "Super Bag Gloves" made by Ringside.


    So what do they put in them ? Used to be horse hair, which does actually work, but it would shift around with use, so you could end up with bare knuckles under the leather after several rounds. They used to use layers of different density foam starting in the 80s, then moved on to advanced injection molded foam and also memory foam. Mexican Fight Gloves can still be found with horse hair (they make for absolutely token gloves fight gloves). Cleto Reyes is the go-to brand for Mexican gloves. BTW they make my favorite head guard.


    BTW you will find only garbage equipment in sporting good stores. If Ringside puts something in a store, it's a commercial sucker grade quality and price. You have to order direct from manufacturers to get good equipment, and it costs much more (but is worth it). The first thing to go on shit gloves is the inside lining. If you are serious about boxing, the garbage you get at stores will last only 2-3 workouts, and it doesn't feel good.


    So what about hand wraps ?


    I've never seen good wraps for sale in stores. They are too short (about half the length they should be), and the material they are made of is too thick and stiff. If you have nothing else, you can use store bought ones, and sew two pairs together. The good ones.... well, let's say 25 years ago, were made by Ringside or Title (both out of Lenexa KS - but they have since moved manufacturing to Asia). Anyways, they are light thin, and flexible and of the proper length.


    They are made of a cotton herringbone weave pattern and have a little bit of elasticity. There is another style of wrap known as the Mexican style wrap - they are very thin and very flexible, and highly elastic. I don't like them as they take a lot of skill to get on just right, and they are not durable at all. The main problem is they're too elastic for my taste, and you often end up with a wrap that is too tight, and it cuts off your circulation (ever wear an Ace bandage too tight ?). Speaking of Ace bandage, they are way too elastic to be used as wraps. Not enough support, and they cut circulation.


    There are several ways to wrap your hands and it's a personal preference. You have to loop your thumb first, do a couple of X's around your hand/wrist, then do one X for each space between your fingers. You then go around the knuckles twice, then do figure 8's around your hand wrist until you have enough left to go around the base of your forearm twice. You have to wrap it firm but yielding a little to not cut off your circulation.


    Next, you need to tape it up. Medical Tape is the best thing, but it's prohibitively expensive. The go-to tape is good old white hockey tape (the thin cut stuff - about 3/4"). At least in Canada (back in the day), you could buy entire boxes of the stuff for almost nothing.


    So after your wraps are on (not too tight - wait a good minute to see if your circulation is cut off), you basically do a figure 8 around your thumb twice, then do a couple of X's around your hand and wrist, then got around to cover your knuckles and wrap twice around your wrist. You just want to use just enough tape to give a little extra support, but mostly to keep the wraps from coming apart. If you do it right, you use just enough tape so nothing will move during your workout.


    For a fight, hands are wrapped in medical bandage and there are very strict rules as to how much tape can be used. The wrapping process must be witnessed by an inspector, and he will usually sign his name with a sharpie on the wraps/tape when it is done. Medical bandage and medical tape does a good job, but you only get one use out of it, so nobody uses it in training (too expensive). Good wraps last almost forever unless they are the Mexican style ones.


    You should have multiple pairs of wraps for training and wash each one after use (unless you want them to mold up and nobody will get near you because of the smell). You always have to let your gloves and sparring gear dry in a well ventilated place as well.

  • Absolutely... meant to say the combination of gloves and wrap is what prevents hand injuries. I find it hard to believe that the old bare knuckle fighters went a hundred rounds or more!!! Most was like 200? or so for almost 5 hours in the ring. brutal shit.


    lazs

    "Don't let it end like this. Tell them I said something."



    Pancho Villa, last words (1877 - 1923)

  • Absolutely... meant to say the combination of gloves and wrap is what prevents hand injuries. I find it hard to believe that the old bare knuckle fighters went a hundred rounds or more!!! Most was like 200? or so for almost 5 hours in the ring. brutal shit.


    lazs

    Yeah the old timers (1800s and prior) would often go dozens of rounds - and from the woodcuts and illustrations of the era, the beatings they took were horrific and bloody. I suspect they fought very carefully with very measured blows. I also think they might go several rounds just ranging and not really committing to an attack. Medical attention was crude (think Civil War era).


    Gloves made it so fights were far less bloody and dangerous (in terms of long term injuries especially to the eyes), and ended much sooner.


    Old timers would train by walking - almost exclusively. Some would walk 100 miles over several days without sleep. The training was geared for developing mental toughness more than anything else. They also cut taking alcohol (degenerate drinking was the norm in the 1800s) in the weeks before the fight.


    They were more tough than skilled.

  • Those 100 round plus fights werent 3 minute rounds,it wasnt until Marquess of Queensberry rules came in that gloves and 3 minute rounds came in to affect. Prior to that rounds normally ended when one of the boxers went down and usually no holds were barred so you could grab and hold poke an eye etc. You fought to survive.


    Amateur boxing uses a slightly different glove from the pros,hand wraps are much the same and had to be certified by an official. I always preferred the mexican wraps when training but to each their own. I also used a wrist wrap when training,just to easy to sprain a wrist.

  • The Mexican wraps were good if you got them at just the right tension, but I always tended to wrap them just a little too tight. Real PITA to have to yank tape and start all over again (that's 100% on me). I think most people preferred the Mexican wraps, and you also can get away with not taping them esp if you aren't going to go crazy.


    I have to stay off the boxing supply websites as I have an almost uncontrollable urge to buy shit I most definitely have no use for anymore. I was looking at some Cleto Reyes gear and I started filling a cart - I had to log off.

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