old televisions

  • i use to buy old tvs, this is going back to the 1980s. invararably they wern't working when i bought them. some of them i was given for free. these tv,s were old vacuum tube clunkers from the 1960s and early 1970s. i got many of them going. often they just needed a new vacuum tube. many high voltage shocks was had but also a lot of learning

  • The old PAR scopes had a CRT with a protruding anode called an Akwadag (sic). You were supposed to attach a grounding clip on that anytime it was out of the console as it would sit there and build up a charge. If you didn't and got close to it the discharge would hurt like hell. So I've heard. :wink

  • I remembered it wrong, been a long time. The aquadag was the coating inside the CRT that built up the charge. The protruding knob to which the high voltage was connected was just the anode.

  • the caps would hold a charge for a time after the the power was turned off too the set. you had to bleed the voltage off to earth .


    most of the tv's i fixed and got working i used and modified for DXing the vhf bands using home made aerials.

  • BACK THEN IT WAS AN EASY AND CHeap way of getting vhf radio gear. i use to pick up emergency services in the the u.s and tv from australia and south america.


    i think i told you that i use to operate modified cb's back then. i had a regular contact with a woman in vietnam in 1979. she was a school teacher. lost contact with her. i have allways wondered about her. it was along time ago.

  • i got some usefull results. i watched alot of aussie tv. it was a solar peak back then. the muf was way in vh2 for many weeks.


    this was 1979/80


    on the hf band i had a regular hook with a lady in vietnam. she was a school teacher. that was on the 11 meter band. i lost contact with her after several months.she was multiingal. allways wondered what happened to her

  • Capacitors will hold a charge. It's a myth that they will kill ya. Take your dykes and rub them to the frame.


    Bingo bango.

    they could give you a hell of shock. i got belted many times from not just tv's but tranceivers. i learned the hard way to bleed down the caps before poking my fingners the finanls.

  • i had an old tranceiver that i worked on. the finals had 600 volts running through them. i got belted several times while working on it. it was an old yaesu ft101b. i never got it working properly. mica caps were hard to get. they had such high voltage. tubes were easy to get then.


    here is a tip if you work on vacuum stuff and it the thing aint working. put a finger on each tube, they should be hot to the touch. if a tube is cool to the touch it is either defective or it aint getting juice. check the resistors near the tube, they often burn out . the high voltage and heat burns them out.