DOWN. YOUR. THROAT.


  • Backyard Commandos INC, HMFIC


    I disagree but I respect your right to be stupid.


    Winners focus on winning, losers focus on winners.


    It's hard for liberals with mental disorders to think that other people don't also have the same mental disorders. - Danneskjold 2018

  • https://www.yahoo.com/news/lgb…candidates-155537023.html




    LGBT sweep in historic election for transgender candidates

    512

    Dylan Stableford
    •November 8, 2017

    90c06d06212e19c18492511b5451b4e1

    It was a big night for Democrats on Tuesday, with the party winning key races in what party officials declare is a repudiation of President Trump’s first year in office. It was also a historic night for transgender and LGBT candidates around the country.

    became the first openly transgender person to be elected to the state legislature. Roem, a 33-year-old Democrat, former journalist and current member of a thrash metal band, defeated 73-year-old Bob Marshall, a 26-year incumbent, social conservative and author of a proposed “bathroom bill” prohibiting trans people from using the bathroom of their choice. Marshall, who once referred to himself as Virginia’s “chief homophobe,” had refused to publicly debate her during the campaign." data-reactid="19">In Virginia, Danica Roem became the first openly transgender person to be elected to the state legislature. Roem, a 33-year-old Democrat, former journalist and current member of a thrash metal band, defeated 73-year-old Bob Marshall, a 26-year incumbent, social conservative and author of a proposed “bathroom bill” prohibiting trans people from using the bathroom of their choice. Marshall, who once referred to himself as Virginia’s “chief homophobe,” had refused to publicly debate her during the campaign.

    68dec19f31f2eeedee55cb497a4b1956

    Roem is believed to be just the second openly transgender legislator to be elected in the country. In 2012, Stacie Laughton was elected to the New Hampshire House — the first openly transgender person elected to a state legislature in the United States. (Althea Garrison was elected to the Massachusetts House as a Republican in 1992, but it wasn’t until after the election her birth as a male was reported. She served one term.)

    Aisha C. Moodie-Mills, whose Gay & Lesbian Victory Fund raised more than $200,000 for Roem’s candidacy, said in a statement that “2017 will be remembered as the year of the trans candidate — and Danica’s heroic run for office the centerpiece of that national movement.”

    “It’s historic,” Democratic House Caucus Chair Charniele Herring told the Associated Press. “It sends a message to politicians everywhere that the politics of bigotry is over.”

    8e7c25494460bd299e5ecc46b29c227b

    became the first openly transgender person elected to office in the state. The 33-year-old father of two grabbed one of four open seats on the Erie School Board, on Tuesday" data-reactid="37">In Pennsylvania, Tyler Titus became the first openly transgender person elected to office in the state. The 33-year-old father of two grabbed one of four open seats on the Erie School Board, on Tuesday

    “Tyler Titus shattered a lavender ceiling in Pennsylvania today, and his victory will resonate well-beyond state boundaries,” the Victory Fund said in a statement. “Trans people remain severely underrepresented in our politics and government, and now more than ever we need trans voices like Tyler’s in the halls of power.”

    f7d068fa7efc03d50536feed7167b0da

    In Minnesota, Andrea Jenkins became the first transgender person of color to be elected to any office in the United States. Jenkins, who got 73 percent of the vote, walloped her three opponents to be elected to the Minneapolis city council.

    Another trans candidate, Phillipe Cunningham, also ran for a seat on Minneapolis’ city council, but the results of that race have yet to be determined.

    d0e19434ff0b72b42263a5d5663772cc

    became the first transgender person elected to a nonjudicial office in the state, winning a seat on the Palm Springs city council." data-reactid="55">In California, Lisa Middleton became the first transgender person elected to a nonjudicial office in the state, winning a seat on the Palm Springs city council.

    “It’s all because of all of you that we are here tonight,” Middleton told supporters after her win, calling it a “historic victory for our city and for our state.”

    da688d98f64e2a032d8fcc7c0d2cba85

    was elected to become Seattle’s first openly lesbian mayor — and the Emerald City’s first female mayor since the 1920s. Durkan, a former federal prosecutor, defeated fellow female Democrat Cary Moon in the nonpartisan mayoral race. Both women were vying for the seat vacated by former Seattle Mayor Ed Murray, a gay man who resigned in September after being accused by five men of sexual abuse. Murray has denied the charges." data-reactid="64">In Washington state, Jenny Durkan was elected to become Seattle’s first openly lesbian mayor — and the Emerald City’s first female mayor since the 1920s. Durkan, a former federal prosecutor, defeated fellow female Democrat Cary Moon in the nonpartisan mayoral race. Both women were vying for the seat vacated by former Seattle Mayor Ed Murray, a gay man who resigned in September after being accused by five men of sexual abuse. Murray has denied the charges.

    “Tonight was about fighting back,” Moodie-Mills added. “But it is also an undeniably historic night for the LGBTQ movement and for trans equality, having moved the needle on what is possible for a trans leader who aspires to run for office and make positive change.”

  • Instead of copy and paste the whole article, could you just paste the link itself?


    That way I don't have to scroll all that way to bypass your drivel...

    MNN on 6/18/19

    "chump will assuredly lose 2020 barring an event that cancels the election - he just cant keep his scummy yankee mouth shut"


    MNN on 6/24/19

    Chump is going to tote an ass kicking nov 2020

  • I bet... If you counted and subtracted the old senile people who voted for those trannies that didn't even know they were trannies... The trannies would have lost.

    Of all tyrannies a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It may be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies, The robber baron's cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end, for they do so with the approval of their own conscience. — C.S. Lewis

    :this

    The post was edited 1 time, last by Sluggo ().

  • Ok.. some sort of guilt issue is playing out here.. any study you care to name says that good looking people do better than ugly people in everything. and.. those trans people? by any standard those are some ugly muther fuckers.


    lazs

    "Don't let it end like this. Tell them I said something."



    Pancho Villa, last words (1877 - 1923)

  • http://abcnews.go.com/Politics…g-virginia-house-51005119




    Democrats come close to retaking Virginia House


    • By SARAH RANKIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS

    RICHMOND, Va. — Nov 8, 2017, 12:50 AM ET

    Chris HurstThe Associated Press Democrat Chris Hurst, right, defeated Republican incumbent Joseph Yost to win House District 12 on Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017, in Blacksburg, Va. Hurst celebrates with a packed room of supporters at The Hyatt Place in Blacksburg. (Heather Rousseau/The Roanoke Times via AP)

    more +

    Democrats nearly wiped out Republicans' overwhelming majority on Election Day in the Virginia House of Delegates, with a handful of races that will decide control of the body remaining too close to call.

    Democrats picked up at least 13 of the 17 seats on Tuesday they would need to retake the chamber for the first time in two decades.

    "It really is an unprecedented result we're seeing," House Democratic Caucus Leader David Toscano said. The last time Democrats picked up more than five seats was 1975, according to Toscano.

    This election season, with all 100 seats up for grabs, saw Democrats make their most energetic push in years to gain ground against Republicans. Sixty of the seats were contested by candidates of both major parties, more than in any year for at least two decades.

    The House gains were part of a stellar night for Democrats, who swept all three statewide races. Democrat Ralph Northam beat Republican Ed Gillespie in the governor's race by nearly 9 points.

    Together, Tuesday's electoral outcomes will be seen as an overwhelming victory for those opposed to President Donald Trump and as a potential predictor for next year's midterm election, when control of Congress and many more statehouses will be up for grabs.

    In the run-up to Tuesday's balloting, Democrats said they were confident, but many analysts had expected them to pick up no more than a handful of seats.

    Republicans maintained during the campaign that they would retain their majority. Their years in power helped them build up a significant cash advantage, and they argued that voters in local races care about local issues — not what's going on in Washington.

    "Obviously, tonight was a difficult night and the outcome is not what anyone expected," Matt Moran, spokesman for the House Republican Caucus, said in a statement Tuesday night.

    The shift in power could have far reaching policy and political implications. It will change the makeup of committees, and Republicans may no longer be able to block Medicaid expansion. Democrats in Virginia also will have greater leverage when drawing new congressional and legislative boundaries during the next redistricting.

    "I told Ralph I am jealous" of the legislature he will get to work with, said Gov. Terry McAuliffe, who fought the General Assembly unsuccessfully on Medicaid expansion for four years.

    It wasn't immediately clear how long it would be before the full results are known.

    Seven seats were too close to call early Wednesday. Many of those could be subject to recounts if candidates choose to request them.

    In one race, only 12 votes separated Republican Del. David Yancey and Democratic challenger Shelly Simonds.

    Among the Democrats' influx of candidates this year were a record 43 women, many of whom said they were inspired by Hillary Clinton's defeat to jump into politics for the first time. At least nine of the new seats will be filled by women.

    Among those will be Danica Roem, who is transgender. A former journalist, she unseated Bob Marshall, one of the chamber's longest-serving and most conservative members. Earlier this year, Marshall sponsored a bill that would have limited the bathrooms transgender people can use.

    Roem will be Virginia's first openly transgender lawmaker. She will also make history as the first openly transgender person elected and seated in a state legislature, according to the Victory Fund, a political action committee that works to get openly LGBTQ people elected.

    Several other Democratic women also made history Tuesday night: Hala Ayala and Elizabeth Guzman — who both ousted Republican incumbents — will be the chamber's first Latina members, and Kathy Tran will be its first female Asian-American member.

    In the Blacksburg area, Chris Hurst, a former Virginia news anchor whose journalist girlfriend was fatally shot during a live broadcast in 2015, defeated a Republican incumbent. After the shooting, Hurst became the public face of the grieving Roanoke station.

    ———

    Associated Press writers Matthew Barakat in Fairfax, Virginia, and Alan Suderman in Richmond contributed to this report.

  • Sorry, that one needs updating. The Democrats have now taken at least 15 seats.



    https://www.washingtonpost.com…0-cb18a8c29c65_story.html




    Democrats make significant gains in Virginia legislature; control of House in play

    By Fenit Nirappil November 8 at 1:06 PM
    Governors_Races_26855-60950.jpg?uuid=bW5-xMQVEeeq4MsYqMKcZQ


    Karina Smith holds her son Kyler Smith, 2, as she fills out her ballot at a polling place Tuesday in Alexandria, Va. (Alex Brandon/AP)

    The Democratic wave in Virginia on Tuesday wiped out the Republican majority in the state House of Delegates, throwing control of the chamber in play for the first time since 2000 and putting Republicans in blue-tinged districts across the country on alert for next year’s elections.

    Democrats snared at least 15 seats in an upset that stunned members of both parties and arrived with national implications.

    Unofficial returns showed Democrats unseating at least a dozen Republicans and flipping three seats that had been occupied by GOP incumbents who did not seek reelection. Four other races were so close that they qualify for a recount, and the outcome will determine control of the chamber. The results marked the most sweeping shift in control of the legislature since Reconstruction.

    Republicans, who have controlled the chamber since 2000, went into Tuesday holding 66 of 100 seats. Democrats fielded the most candidates in recent memory, including a record number of women.

    Control of the chamber may not be determined for days as provisional ballots are counted in narrow races.

    Democrats need to hold one seat where they are narrowly leading to ensure a 50-50 split where power sharing would be necessary, and to pick up an additional seat in a race eligible for a recount to take full control of the chamber.

    Play Video 1:21

    Here’s what happened in Virginia’s 2017 election

    Democrat Ralph Northam won the Virginia governor’s race over Republican Ed Gillespie on Nov. 7. Here are some other takeaways from the state’s election. (Video: Amber Ferguson/Photo: Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post)

    The election signaled a major shift in the gender of a body long dominated by men: Of the 15 seats Democrats flipped, all were held by men and 11 were won by women. Several of those women made history.

    One became Virginia’s first openly transgender person to win elective office, unseating an opponent of LGBT rights. Another became the first open lesbian elected to the House of Delegates, another the first Asian American woman and two, both from diverse Prince William County, are set to be the first Latinas elected to the General Assembly.

    “This is an unbelievable night,” said House Minority Leader David J. Toscano (D-Charlottesville) in an interview an hour after polls closed. “There were districts we didn’t think we had much of a shot in.”

    [Why Democrats care about Virginia’s normally sleepy House of Delegate races]

    Democrats benefited from gubernatorial contender Ralph Northam’s coattails: He won by nine percentage points.

    “Obviously, tonight was a difficult night, and the outcome is not what anyone expected,” said Matt Moran, spokesman for the House Republican Caucus. “We also want to thank our colleagues and fellow Republican candidates who ran principled campaigns based on positive ideas in a difficult political environment. Our team is closely monitoring the canvasses that will take place tomorrow as we await the official results.”

    Although House races are normally seen as the sleepy backwater to the gubernatorial contest, they generated a surge of interest this year from activists energized by President Trump’s election and new groups that see the legislative contests as an opportunity to test strategies and technologies ahead of next year’s elections.

    Strategists said the results suggest trouble for Republicans.

    “This is a tidal wave,” said David Wasserman, an analyst who tracks U.S. House races for the nonpartisan Cook Political Report. “It’s hard to look at tonight’s results and to conclude anything other than that Democrats are the current favorite for control of the House in 2018.”

    The highest-spending House of Delegates race was in southwest Virginia, where former television news anchor Chris Hurst, whose girlfriend was fatally shot during a live broadcast in 2015, challenged Republican incumbent Joseph Yost.

    Both raised more than $1 million for their bids, and Hurst won.

    [In southwest Virginia, a hotly contested race free of hyperpartisan toxicity]

    A pair of Democratic incumbents easily fended off well-financed challenges by Republicans. Subba Kolla, who would have been the body’s first Indian American lawmaker, lost to Del. John J. Bell in Loudoun County, and Heather Cordasco fell to Del. Michael P. Mullin in Hampton Roads.

    Democrats flipped the most seats in Northern Virginia as Northam posted a strong showing in the populous region. If results hold, Democrats will hold every delegate seat in Arlington, Alexandria, Fairfax and Prince William counties — and all but one in Loudoun County.

    The biggest battleground for the House was Prince William, a Washington exurb where people of color constitute a majority of the population. A diverse group of five Democratic challengers hoped to channel demographic changes and Democratic energy to take seats held by white men — and all won.

    [In diverse Virginia suburb, Democrats hope to chart path back to power]

    Danica Roem, who will be Virginia’s first openly transgender elected official, defeated Del. Robert G. Marshall (R-Prince William), a culture warrior who opposes LGBT rights. Elizabeth Guzman, who raised more money than any Democratic candidate except for Hurst, unseated Del. L. Scott Lingamfelter (R-Woodbridge).

    Republican Dels. Richard L. Anderson (Prince William) and Jackson H. Miller (Manassas) lost to their Democratic challengers, Hala Ayala and Lee Carter. Ayala and Guzman are Latina, and Carter is a member of the Democratic Socialists of America.

    In an open seat vacated by a retiring Republican, Democrat Jennifer Carroll Foy easily defeated Republican Michael Makee.

    In Fairfax County, Democrat Kathy Tran, the daughter of Vietnamese refugees, beat Republican Lolita Mancheno-Smoak for an open seat vacated by retiring Del. David B. Albo (R), while Democrat Karrie Delaney handily defeated Del. James M. LeMunyon (R). Del. Timothy D. Hugo, the Republican caucus chairman, was narrowly trailing Democratic challenger Donte Tanner, and the results were within the margin for a state-funded recount. Hugo picked up 100 votes during a Fairfax County canvass on Wednesday morning.

    [More mothers of young children running for office in Virginia]

    With nearly all precincts reporting in Loudoun County, Del. Thomas A. “Tag” Greason (R) was set to lose to Democratic challenger David Reid in that county’s most competitive race in a district that Hillary Clinton carried by 19 points a year ago.

    Greason’s fellow Loudoun County lawmaker, Del. J. Randall Minchew, lost his seat to Democratic challenger Wendy Gooditis. Another Loudoun County Republican lawmaker, David A. LaRock, defeated his Democratic challenger, Tia Walbridge — and may be the lone Republican left representing Northern Virginia in the House.

    In the Richmond suburbs, Dels. John M. O’Bannon III and G. Manoli Loupassi lost their seats to Debra Rodman and Dawn Adams, who is openly lesbian. Democrat Schuyler T. VanValkenburg won an open seat vacated by Republican Jimmie Massie III.

    In the Virginia Beach area, Del. Ronald A. Villanueva lost to Democrat Kelly Fowler, while N.D. “Rocky” Holcomb III lost to Cheryl Turpin in a squeaker. Del. Glenn R. Davis Jr. narrowly pulled out a win for reelection.

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    Republicans were barely leading in three contests that were in the margin for a recount, including in the race to succeed retiring Speaker William J. Howell (R-Stafford). Del. David Yancey (R-Newport News) led Shelly Simonds by only 12 votes.

    Even if Democrats fall short of taking control of the chamber this year, they see a potential for additional pickups next year, if a court challenge of legislative district maps forces special elections, and in 2019 when all 100 seats are on the ballot again.

    Republicans have a narrow 21-to-19 majority in the state Senate, where all seats are up in 2019.

    Control of the governor’s mansion and legislature in Virginia has national implications. The General Assembly will draw congressional and state legislative district maps after the 2020 Census, and the governor has the power to veto those maps.

    Maria Sacchetti and Jenna Portnoy contributed to this report.

  • I think it's great.

    Of all tyrannies a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It may be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies, The robber baron's cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end, for they do so with the approval of their own conscience. — C.S. Lewis

    :this

  • I'm pretty sure this is fake news but it's awesome none the less!


    https://usadailyreview.com/201…ify-allah-every-decision/

    Of all tyrannies a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It may be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies, The robber baron's cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end, for they do so with the approval of their own conscience. — C.S. Lewis

    :this

  • I bet... If you counted and subtracted the old senile people who voted for those trannies that didn't even know they were trannies... The trannies would have lost.

    You mean the Baby Boomers? They all voted Tealiban Party. Fortunately they are dropping like flies from old age, while liberal Millennials are finally waking up from their extended adolescence. Last year Millennials learned that there are dire consequences for not voting. This year they learned that they have the power to replace politicians they don't like. 2018 will be fun. Get ready for some wacky impeachment shenanigans.

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