starting to look like.....

  • Yeah.. I got that but my point was that no one woke up or checked on the deck below the crew and above the passengers until it was heavily engulfed in flames and smoke. No one heard the smoke alarms and apparently the escape hatch was not working.


    I don't think that a crew member being awake would have mattered at all unless he was on duty on the middle deck where they fire started.


    lazs

    It's supposed to be a roving watch- and they would, in all probability, be on the mess deck. It wasn't that big of a boat, and it had to take some time for it to become fully engulfed. Had the crew done what they were supposed to do 34 people would still be alive today- they screwed the pooch, and heads will roll.

  • The one crew member who died was below deck with the others.


    You know that when you're asleep, you cannot smell. That's why a lot of people die from smoke inhalation. That's why we have fire alarms. You will not wake up to the smell of fire until you're choking on it. Then it's too late.

  • You know, there are things in this world I’d just as soon not know about.

    Backyard Commandos INC, HMFIC


    I disagree but I respect your right to be stupid.


    Winners focus on winning, losers focus on winners.


    It's hard for liberals with mental disorders to think that other people don't also have the same mental disorders. - Danneskjold 2018

  • The one crew member who died was below deck with the others.


    You know that when you're asleep, you cannot smell. That's why a lot of people die from smoke inhalation. That's why we have fire alarms. You will not wake up to the smell of fire until you're choking on it. Then it's too late.

    That's also why the Coast Guard requires you to have a 24/7 watch on commercial vessels carrying passengers- and these guys blew it off and hit their racks. Let's assume it was a lithium battery that ignited- had there been a roving watch as required by law it should have been discovered within minutes with minimal damage to the vessel and no loss of life.

    As I've said all along this is a tragedy that never should have happened but for the negligence of the crew- it had to take some time for the fire to spread, and had someone been on watch it would have been prevented. Instead they were all asleep, the fire started, and by the time the crew woke up the vessel was fully engulfed- it wasn't the fault of a lithium battery, it was the fault of a Captain and crew who were derelict in their duty. The reason you have a fire watch on duty 24/7 is to prevent tragedies like this, and they didn't. There will be manslaughter charges over this, you wait and see- and there should be.

  • Yeah... no idea what a roving watch really is or the requirements but a fire from an explosion of something can build pretty fast depending on materials around. I asked my dad who was a fireman a long time ago and he said he seen whole families die from smoke inhalation while one family member was trying to put out a kitchen fire that got away really really fast.


    I have an extinguisher by the stove... everyone should.


    lazs

    "Don't let it end like this. Tell them I said something."



    Pancho Villa, last words (1877 - 1923)

  • Yeah... no idea what a roving watch really is or the requirements but a fire from an explosion of something can build pretty fast depending on materials around. I asked my dad who was a fireman a long time ago and he said he seen whole families die from smoke inhalation while one family member was trying to put out a kitchen fire that got away really really fast.


    I have an extinguisher by the stove... everyone should.


    lazs

    Yep, have one in the kitchen and one in the garage. No time to go searching when a fire starts.

  • Kitchen fires are the worst... but garage ones can be at least as bad. even with people awake they often take down the entire home before the FD gets there.


    lazs

    "Don't let it end like this. Tell them I said something."



    Pancho Villa, last words (1877 - 1923)

  • That is great KdF.... I bought a six pack of those disposable ones. I actually tried one on a grease fire in an old frying pan in the back yard... they work long enough but just in case I keep em around in pairs.


    For work we had to lean how to use FE's we would take the large size and just try to put out a fire that was solvent and scrap wood... it is harder than it seems. If you don't go for the base of the flames you don't do squat.


    lazs

    "Don't let it end like this. Tell them I said something."



    Pancho Villa, last words (1877 - 1923)

  • Yeah... no idea what a roving watch really is or the requirements but a fire from an explosion of something can build pretty fast depending on materials around. I asked my dad who was a fireman a long time ago and he said he seen whole families die from smoke inhalation while one family member was trying to put out a kitchen fire that got away really really fast.


    I have an extinguisher by the stove... everyone should.


    lazs

    A roving fire watch goes from compartment to compartment to monitor the vessel for potential danger to the crew and passengers. Some have a lock clock and various keys at various places and depending on the vessel the requirement is a key in, say, the engine room has to be used on the lock clock every 15 minutes... the lock clock is carried by the fire watch, and passed to the next watch and then checked by the Officer In Charge the next day.

    On a more informal "civilian" boat they're required to check engine room spaces, berthing spaces, the deck and the galley area... on most small boats the watch is usually in the mess deck area, which is where this fire started (if it was a lithium battery fire). But the main thing is they're required to stay awake and alert- there's a million things that can go wrong on a boat, from fire to flooding, which is why you ALWAYS have somebody on watch.

    Because this crew didn't have anyone on watch the fire probably started small and got progressively larger... had there been somebody on watch an alarm could have been sounded and the passengers could have used the escape scuttle. The main issue is the length of time between the start of the fire and the discovery of the fire by the crew... if the entire main deck was engulfed when the crew woke up it'd obviously been burning far longer than it would have been if they'd had a crew member on watch.


    Sad all around- and it'll be expensive in civil court and punitive in criminal court.

  • Air don't they have smoke detectors on boats - like those home ones ?

    I'm sure they do, and they have automatic fire suppression systems in engine rooms- but back in the olden days we didn't have smoke detectors... we carried around a small cage with a canary in it and if it dropped dead we'd sound the alarm, but that was a long time ago... I'm sure that technology has passed me by and who knows? Maybe some day we'll make ships out of steel instead of wood.

    OK, going out on a limb here- I'm betting they had a smoke alarm but there was nobody awake or in the space to hear it sound. As a former small boat sailor I find this so inexcusable of the Captain and the crew it's so egregious... I've been on boats that have had fires, for whatever reason, usually a cigarette tossed in a waste can, or a grease fire in a galley, or an electrical panel that shorts out... this shit can happen on a 75 foot boat, and often does. To me it's so inexcusable there was no watch awake because there's so much shit that can go wrong. Fuck man- a hose fitting can get loose and flood your main engine room. A bilge pump can quit. There's so much shit that can fuck up it's unfathomable to me that entire crew was asleep. You got six people, and not one of them was awake.

    Had you been that derelict back in my day I would have beat you to death if you were sleeping on watch- seriously. People can die on the water.

  • https://www.washingtonpost.com…port-says/?outputType=amp


    "The NTSB’s two-page report states that the five crew members who survived were asleep on the uppermost level when the fire began. They told investigators that the sixth crew member, who died alongside the boat’s 33 passengers, was also asleep in the bunk room on the lower deck, agency spokesman Eric Weiss said."


    Fuck that's maddening just reading that... FUCK.