Are death sentences still getting reprieved in Washington state?

  • first of all... I think the number of people who have not committed crimes that are awful is BECAUSE of the death penalty is higher than those who "fight to the death" (LOL) to avoid capture. I think life in prison or the death penalty has about the same effect once they are surrounded by the police.


    My proof is that I have seldom seen anyone who did not fight the death penalty once given. They are afraid of it so it is a deterrent.


    As for those 'wrongly convicted' well... show me one case that is proven without a doubt that is not from the almost 100 years ago. And.. show me one that didn't deserve it even tho maybe DNA got the fucker off on that particular one. Take a look at the rap sheets on these model citizens.


    lazs

    "Don't let it end like this. Tell them I said something."



    Pancho Villa, last words (1877 - 1923)

  • I am of two minds on the death penalty thing. On the one hand.. death is the final deterrent. There is no possibility of that person ever being a danger to society once he gets the bullet in the brain.. no chance of escape or getting let loose.


    On the other... a life of hard labor gives the person time to contemplate their sins before meeting their maker.


    lazs

    Of course, 'hard labor' isn't allowed anymore

    Propaganda is a manipulation tool focused primarily on emotions. It has little to do with truth or facts and everything to do with persuasion and motivation.

  • That is not at all what I asked you quisling. Almost every one of those were he said she said and of a sexual nature which is always iffy.. and not crimes that would put you on death row.


    Trust the government? you mean trust the accuser right? who are we supposed to trust?


    lazs

    "Don't let it end like this. Tell them I said something."



    Pancho Villa, last words (1877 - 1923)

  • Can you even read Coward? The first three on that list was for murder. And David Camm's case in 2000 was especially atrocious. He spent 13 years in prison unjustly for the murder of his own wife and two children.


    This is the quality of investigation, incompetence and corruption you can expect from the U.S. justice system:


    "The key evidence against Camm was testimony regarding blood spatter patterns on his tee shirt. It was later discovered that one of the key prosecution witnesses, a blood spatter analyst whose findings had triggered the arrest, had falsified his credentials. He had testified at trial that he was a college professor in the process of getting his PhD. It was later uncovered that he had no affiliation to the university, had no training in blood spatter or crime scene analysis, and had never worked a single case prior to the Camm family murders.


    In 2013, he testified for the defense, explaining that he worked as an office assistant for a crime scene analyst and had been sent to the crime scene to take photos when he began voicing his opinions on the evidence. He claims the prosecutor, Stan Faith, fabricated the credentials for the trial. A new suspect emerged when the defense compelled the prosecution to run DNA evidence found on a sweatshirt on the floor of the crime scene through CODIS a second time.


    It was discovered that the DNA was never run through CODIS despite the fact that Faith had assured Camm's defense team that it had been run and it returned no matches. The sweatshirt contained the DNA, prison nickname, and department of corrections number of Charles Boney, a convicted felon with a history of stalking and attacking women. He was on parole at the time for the attempted kidnapping of several coeds from their apartment. Investigators had looked for Camm's DNA on the sweatshirt, but failed to investigate any other leads.


    A DNA analyst who worked on the case filed a complaint alleging that the prosecutor attempted to get her to testify that the foreign DNA sample was Camm's DNA. A fingerprint analyst who found Boney's prints testified to a similar interaction. The prosecutor was later discovered to be Boney's defense attorney as well as a personal family friend and they admitted discussing the case prior to Boney becoming a suspect. Faith asserts this is coincidental and he did not know Boney was involved."

    "With the first link, the chain is forged. The first speech censured, the first thought forbidden, the first freedom denied, chains us all irrevocably."

  • Again.. you realize that not all murder is a capital offense right?


    You are the one who believes in prison.. all these people would have been in prison regardless of the death penalty.


    I asked you for people wrongly executed.. getting the death penalty is not a simple thing anymore. the crime has to be death penalty worthy.. and. the process takes a long fucking time.


    The anti death penalty people have spent a zillion hours trying to find wrongly executed people. They got nothing and neither do you.


    lazs

    "Don't let it end like this. Tell them I said something."



    Pancho Villa, last words (1877 - 1923)

  • No you didn't Coward, and regardless of the penalty your justice system proves again and again that they cannot be trusted in any way shape or form.


    In any case:



    Carlos DeLuna was executed in Texas in December 1989. Subsequent investigations cast strong doubt upon DeLuna's guilt for the murder of which he had been convicted.[25][26] Carlos Deluna was executed in 1989 for stabbing a gas station clerk to death. His execution came about six years after the crime was committed. The trial ended up attracting local attention, but it was never suggested that an innocent man was about to be punished while the actual killer went free. Deluna was found blocks away from the crime scene with $149 in his pocket. From that point on, it went downhill for the young Carlos Deluna. A wrongful eyewitness testimony is what formed the case against him. Unfortunately, Deluna’s previous criminal record was very much used against him.[27]The real killer, Carlos Hernandez, was a repeat violent offender who actually had a history of slashing women with his unique buck knife, not to mention he looked very similar to Carlos Deluna. Hernandez did not keep quiet about his murder, apparently he went around bragging about the killing of Lopez. In 1999, Hernandez was imprisoned for attacking his neighbor with a knife.




    Jesse Tafero was convicted of murder and executed via electric chair in May 1990 in the state of Florida for the murders of two Florida Highway Patrol officers. The conviction of a co-defendant was overturned in 1992 after a recreation of the crime scene indicated a third person had committed the murders.[29] Not only was Tafero wrongly accused, his electric chair malfunctioned as well – three times. As a result, Tafero’s head caught on fire. After this encounter, a debate was focused around humane methods of execution. Lethal injections became more common in the states rather than the electric chair.




    Johnny Garrett of Texas was executed in February 1992 for allegedly raping and murdering a nun. In March 2004 cold-case DNA testing identified Leoncio Rueda as the rapist and murderer of another elderly victim killed four months earlier.[31] Immediately following the nun's murder, prosecutors and police were certain the two cases were committed by the same assailant.[32] The flawed case is explored in a 2008 documentary entitled The Last Word.





    Cameron Todd Willingham was executed in February 2004 for murdering his three young children by arson at the family home in Corsicana, Texas. Nationally known fire investigator Gerald Hurst reviewed the case documents, including the trial transcriptions and an hour-long videotape of the aftermath of the fire scene, and said in December 2004 that "There's nothing to suggest to any reasonable arson investigator that this was an arson fire. It was just a fire."[33] In 2010, the Innocence Project filed a lawsuit against the State of Texas, seeking a judgment of "official oppression".



    "With the first link, the chain is forged. The first speech censured, the first thought forbidden, the first freedom denied, chains us all irrevocably."

  • LOl quisling.. I did indeed talk about wrongly executed people.. in two of the cases you give.. there is no proof they are innocent. In another the guy was far from innocent since even if he did not commit the act he was involved.


    Of the other two.. I would love to see their rap sheets. Some people need killing. Even so. an hour long documentary on one scum bag who probly got what he deserved? that is why you don't like the death penalty? afraid they are gonna drag some stock broker out of his office and execute him for being a serial killer? LOL


    No.. the jury system is not perfect.. no system is.. what is your alternative? You say you don't trust the jury.. who do you trust?


    lazs

    "Don't let it end like this. Tell them I said something."



    Pancho Villa, last words (1877 - 1923)

  • That rapist runt wouldn't last to first coffee break on a respectable job site.

    Many construction jobs don't even require an application much less a back ground check so unless he spoke up no one would know.


    Although this particular dipshit would have opened his mouth most likely.

  • ...that is why you don't like the death penalty?


    Never said I didn't like the death penalty. I'm very much in favor of the death penalty, even for lesser crimes than murder. Hell, under 'my justice' you might have been executed long ago for drug dealing... However I do recognize that the death penalty has some serious issues when the justice system is so blatantly corrupt and/or incompetent that as many as four percent of all convictions are later overturned.



    No.. the jury system is not perfect.. no system is.. what is your alternative? You say you don't trust the jury.. who do you trust?


    lazs



    The jury system is fine. The corrupt police force, prosecution and judges who provide the evidence the jury makes its judgements on however...

    "With the first link, the chain is forged. The first speech censured, the first thought forbidden, the first freedom denied, chains us all irrevocably."

  • Sgt Schultz is not wrong in this. The judicial industry works hand in hand with the lying police and like the lying police should be avoided at all cost.

    Of all tyrannies a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It may be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies, The robber baron's cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for own good will torment us without end, for they do so with the approval of their own conscience. — C.S. Lewis

  • I really don't think it is as bad as you paranoids make it sound.. for one thing.. if you made 120k a year as a cop.. would you take a chance of losing your job and career just to convict some pissant with planted evidence?


    I also think that most of the 'innocent' are not at all innocent.. they have rap sheets a mile long. I also think that the courts are jammed up as it is.. I don't think they are suffering for a lack of participants.


    No.. I think most of the problems have to do with laziness. get em through the system quick type of thing.


    And yeah quisling.. I probly should have been executed for some of the things I have done. To bad you weren't around to make things right.


    lazs

    "Don't let it end like this. Tell them I said something."



    Pancho Villa, last words (1877 - 1923)

  • Not my job Coward. And you have cops doing far worse than planting evidence, up to and including murder. And we only know about those who get caught on camera.

    "With the first link, the chain is forged. The first speech censured, the first thought forbidden, the first freedom denied, chains us all irrevocably."

  • Of course it is not your job.. you have others do it for you. The point is that there are a lot of cops.. just the state and local it is around 1 million officers. considering the types of situations they get into and the amount of stress... I think the actual 'murder' and such is pretty reasonable. I have no idea how anyone could do it better or with less troubling incidents.


    having said that.. yeah... I agree with sluggo... best to not get involved with them ever.


    lazs

    "Don't let it end like this. Tell them I said something."



    Pancho Villa, last words (1877 - 1923)

  • I don't think it's so much deliberate misjustice as much as lazy prosecution just going after the easiest people to convict.

    Of all tyrannies a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It may be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies, The robber baron's cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for own good will torment us without end, for they do so with the approval of their own conscience. — C.S. Lewis